Remote viewing results of Zimbabwe school ufo enounter

#1
Here is a detailed account of the Zimbabwe school ufo encounter of September 1994 in which 62 school children witness ufos land near their playground and occupants they encounter. Included as well are the results of a remote viewing session where the 5 participants were separated and given no prior information on the target. The results are fascinating, honing in on some strange and unfamiliar piece of technology, occupants, time travel, high frequency vibrations, "folds/layers of spacetime", glossy surfaces, etc. You may not buy into remote viewing as a legit process, but I think this proves there is something to it, as well as confirming the landing of the ufo and its occupants. Here is one remarkable statement by the remote viewer Daz Smith:

"Daz continues – 'I FEEL THAT I AM WATCHING SOMETHING I CANNOT FULLY COMPREHEND. THIS FEELS LIKE IT COULD BE A STRUCTURE THAT CONTAINS LIFE BUT THEN IT SEEMS TO FOLD AND CHANGE SHAPE INTO SOMETHING ELSE, ITS WHOLE SHAPE/MASS/DENSITY/FORM CHANGES. “THIS FEELS LIKE AN OBJECT BUILT TO FOLD SPACE + TIME” LIKE IT GENERATES IT’S OWN WORMHOLE OR SPACE OR TIME OR SOMETHING' Daz describes a lifeform present observing this object from a distance."

http://www.remoteviewed.com/wp-content/u...ssions.pdf
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#2
[...] Suddenly, they saw three silver balls in the sky over the school. These disappeared with a flash of light and then reappeared elsewhere. This happened three times and then they started to move down towards the school with one of them landing (or hovering) over a section of rough ground made up of trees, thorn bushes, and some brown-grey cut grass with bamboo shoots sticking up out of the ground

[...] Then a small man (approx 1 metre in height) appeared on top of the object. He walked a little way across the rough ground, became aware of the children and disappeared. He, or someone very like him, then reappeared at the back of the object. The object took off very rapidly and disappeared. The little man was dressed in a tight-fitting black suit which was 'shiny' according to one observant girl (11 years of age). He had a long scrawny neck and huge eyes like rugby balls. He had a pale face with long black hair coming below his shoulders.

[...] The children vary in cultures: there are black, white, coloured and Asian children. One little girl said to me, 'I swear by every hair on my head and the whole Bible that I am telling the truth.' I could see the pleasure on her face when I told her that I believed her. The smaller children from 5-7 years were very frightened at the time and ran shouting 'Help me, help me.' When the older children asked why they were saying this, the reply was, 'He is coming to eat us.' I should think this applied more to the black African children who have legends of tokoloshies eating children.


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tokoloshies: "In Zulu/Xhosa mythology, Tikoloshe, Tokoloshe, De'Avion or Hili is a dwarf-like water sprite. It is considered a mischievous and evil spirit that can become invisible by drinking water. Tokoloshes are called upon by malevolent people to cause trouble for others. At its least harmful, a tokoloshe can be used to scare children, but its power extends to causing illness or even the death of the victim. The creature might be banished by a pastor (especially with an apostolic calling), who has the power to expel it from the area."

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Xhosa mythology: In short, a young girl called Nongqawuse had seen a messenger from the realm of the ancestors at a waterhole, but her uncle misinterpreted the missive to mean the Xhosa had to kill all their cattle to be spared the rule of the British. They did so, and lost everything.

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Nongqawuse was the Xhosa prophet whose prophecies led to a millenarian movement that culminated in the Xhosa cattle-killing movement and famine of 1856-7, in what is now Eastern Cape, South Africa.

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In 1854, the lungsickness disease spread through the cattle of the Xhosa. ... Widespread cattle deaths resulted. In April, 1856 two girls, one named Nongqawuse, went to scare birds out of the fields. When she returned, she told her uncle Mhlakaza that she had met three spirits at the bushes, and that they had told her that all cattle should be slaughtered, and their crops destroyed. On the day following the destruction, the dead Xhosa would return and help expel the whites. The ancestors would bring cattle with them to replace those that had been killed. Mhlakaza believed the prophecy, and repeated it to the chief Sarhili.

Sarhili ordered the commands of the spirits to be obeyed. At first, the Xhosa were ordered to destroy their fat cattle. Nongqawuse, standing in the river where the spirits had first appeared, heard unearthly noises, interpreted by her uncle as orders to kill more and more cattle. At length, the spirits commanded that not an animal of all their herds was to remain alive, and every grain of corn was to be destroyed. I

f that were done, on a given date, myriads of cattle more beautiful than those destroyed would issue from the earth, while great fields of corn, ripe and ready for harvest, would instantly appear. The dead would rise, trouble and sickness vanish, and youth and beauty come to all alike. Unbelievers and the white man would on that day perish. Great kraals were also prepared for the promised cattle, and huge skin sacks to hold the milk that was soon to be more plentiful than water. At length the day dawned which, according to the prophecies, was to usher in the terrestrial paradise. The sun rose and sank, but the expected miracle did not come to pass.

This movement drew to an end by early 1858. By then, approximately 40,000 people had starved to death and over 400,000 cattle were slaughtered. Among the survivors was the girl Nongqawuse; however, her uncle perished. Sir George Grey, governor of the Cape at the time ordered the European settlers not to help the Xhosa unless they entered labour contracts with the settlers who owned land in the area. Governor Grey and his administration invented a conspiracy called the ‘Chief’s Plot’ where they claimed the chiefs deliberately starved their people... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of...1854-1858)
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#3
Just passing the Peace Pipe around.....

https://www.gaia.com/article/what-is-remote-viewing

Although I think RV is unproven.  I found this part of the article interesting.

Excerpt:
Follow the Ambiguity
Our minds are always attempting to draw conclusions from what we’ve perceiving at any given moment, but because you have no conscious, physical information to work from in RV, you’re almost always likely to be wrong if you do so. Which brings us to one of the great paradoxes of RV: the fainter the perception, the more likely it is to be accurate and the less likely you are to feel confident in that perception.
In other words, the more confident you are about your psychic perceptions during the session, the less likely those perceptions are to be correct! And the less confident you feel, the more likely it is that your perceptions are right on. How’s that for a paradox?

I guess it's good to know the psychic's confidence level the day you pay a visit. If they assure you they're confident then walk away, come back another day. Since we're in unproven territory with RV then I'm not sure if there's any paradox at all.
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