Roybal-Allard Theory: "Trump's wall could split SpaceX launchpad in half"

#1
https://www.techtimes.com/articles/23852...n-half.htm

EXCERPT: . . . The facility in contention is a launch site located in Boca Chica, Texas. It sits on the Gulf of Mexico near Brownsville. [...] U.S. President Donald J. Trump's proposed border wall could cut a SpaceX facility in half, Democratic lawmakers said. A launchpad meant to propel rockets carrying humans to space sits in the middle of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Representative Lucille Roybal-Allard who heads the Homeland Security spending committee raised concerns over the 50-acre facility after she had seen the map showing a barrier running through a launchpad. She promised to ask for the area to be exempted from the planned wall. "This issue with SpaceX is that the fence cuts right through their property and that's a problem," she said.

MORE: https://www.techtimes.com/articles/23852...n-half.htm
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#2
"The National Butterfly Center has filed for a restraining order to keep federal agents and contractors — who plan to build a border wall through the popular nature preserve — off its property.

The butterfly center, located in the small Texas town of Mission in the Rio Grande Valley, has tried for more than a year to stop the border barrier, which Congress approved last March. But the current debate over the Trump administration's demands for billions more dollars in border wall funding has focused national attention on the butterfly preserve's plight.

Executive Director Marianna Treviño-Wright said the center's attorneys filed for a restraining order Monday evening in U.S. District Court in Washington because construction equipment and contractors have driven across the center's property even though the federal government has yet to acquire the land.

The motion, which was first reported by the Texas Observer, accuses the federal Department of Homeland Security in the past week of driving truck and heavy machinery across the center “as if they own it,” replacing the lock on one of the gates and blocking access to “more than two-thirds” of the property.

The filing seeks to prevent any federal employees or federal contractors from “taking any action” on the center’s property “for construction of a border wall, enforcement zone, road or any related installations, or otherwise interfering with the [butterfly center’s] use and enjoyment of its property” pending the outcome of lawsuits filed by the butterfly center and other groups allied against the wall’s construction.

A federal judge on Tuesday had not yet scheduled a hearing on the center's request.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection has said publicly it intends to start building the wall through the butterfly center this month. The agency's spokesman Carlos Diaz declined to comment, citing pending litigation.

Under laws passed since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the Department of Homeland Security has said it can override federal environmental regulations to build barriers at the U.S.-Mexico border.

The lawsuits challenge the Trump administration's decision to speed construction by waiving of dozens of environmental, health and safety laws. In addition to the National Butterfly Center, the Texas waivers allow walls to cut through the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge, Bentsen-Rio Grande State Park as well as other private property.

The cases are still pending.

The attention on the butterfly sanctuary and the current border debate has helped the center raise over $80,000 for its legal defense from more than 1,800 donors through GoFundMe.

A red-bordered Pixie butterfly at the National Butterfly Center in Mission.(Suzanne Cordeiro/Agence France-Presse)
A red-bordered Pixie butterfly at the National Butterfly Center in Mission.
(Suzanne Cordeiro/Agence France-Presse)
But the construction of the wall through the butterfly center isn't directly tied to the current impasse between President Donald Trump and Democrats over Trump's demand for $5.7 billion in border wall funding; Congress last March approved more than $600 million for 33 miles of new barriers in the Rio Grande Valley.

Trump, who campaigned heavily on adding walls to the southern border on Mexico’s dime and held a rally for the wall Monday in El Paso, has said border barriers are necessary to curb unauthorized immigration and other illegal activities.


Ahead of Friday’s deadline to prevent a second government shutdown in 2019, congressional negotiators agreed to a tentative deal to include $1.375 billion for border wall funding.

Trump indicated Tuesday he did not like the agreement. "Am I happy at first glance? The answer is no, I'm not, I'm not happy," Trump said to reporters before a meeting with Cabinet members at the White House.

The agreement also drew criticism from the Center for Biological Diversity, a nonprofit based in Tucson. The nonprofit is suing the Trump administration to challenge border-wall construction in the Rio Grande Valley, as well as near the Santa Teresa Port of Entry in New Mexico and California."---- https://www.dallasnews.com/news/texas/20...nstruction
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#3
(Feb 9, 2019 09:30 PM)C C Wrote: . . . The facility in contention is a launch site located in Boca Chica, Texas. It sits on the Gulf of Mexico near Brownsville. [...] U.S. President Donald J. Trump's proposed border wall could cut a SpaceX facility in half, Democratic lawmakers said. A launchpad meant to propel rockets carrying humans to space sits in the middle of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Half of the SpaceX site is in Mexico?

I don't believe it. The border there is the middle of the Rio Grande river. Presumably any barrier against illegal crossings would be constructed along the northern bank.

I don't believe that the SpaceX site is located directly adjacent to the river. (It is adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico beach.) Assuming for the sake of argument that it really was along the border river, any barrier would be along the river boundary edge of the property. It almost certainly wouldn't "cut a SpaceX facility in half".

Sounds like bullshit to me. Fake news.


[Image: index.php?action=dlattach;topic=41017.0;...2141;image]
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#4
(Feb 14, 2019 10:59 PM)Yazata Wrote: Half of the SpaceX site is in Mexico?


Technically, what Lucille Roybal-Allard seems to have claimed is that the DHS planning documents featured the wall running through the facility's launchpad. Leaving open the possibility that it isn't literally hugging the boundary there. The current border fences don't even strictly follow the dividing line -- there are large sections of US property south of the fences in spots.

All sterile speculation and potentially needless concern on their part, anyway. Since after trying for years, the government still hasn't settled all the complicated efforts and litigation involved in trying to buy-out certain private and protected lands where the old fence projects were supposed to run. So much more the difficulties in settling such anytime soon for a wall that sounds increasingly downgraded to a general barrier or chain/system of impediments.

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#5
(Feb 15, 2019 02:09 AM)C C Wrote: Technically, what Lucille Roybal-Allard seems to have claimed is that the DHS planning documents featured the wall running through the facility's launchpad.

The quote in the OP reads: "A launchpad meant to propel rockets carrying humans to space sits in the middle of the U.S.-Mexico border." Except that it isn't in the middle of the US-Mexico border. The border is the middle of the Rio Grande river, and that's not where the launchpad is.

Quote:Leaving open the possibility that it isn't literally hugging the boundary there. The current border fences don't even strictly follow the dividing line -- there are large sections of US property south of the fences in spots.

I'd guess that they want to avoid that. After all, if there is significant land area between the real border and the border wall, then expect huge numbers of pregnant migrants to travel there to have babies. They could then go to court, claiming that their babies are natural born US citizens because they were born on US territory, even if it is on the other side of the wall.

Quote:All sterile speculation and potentially needless concern on their part, anyway.

It's fundamentally bullshit. Even if we try to spin it so that it makes minimal sense (as you have done) it shouldn't be too hard to route the wall along the periphery of the SpaceX property. (There's a Texas state park along that stretch of beach too, which I expect that they would also want to avoid.) I'm sure that they would be willing to listen if SpaceX has any concerns about where the wall is to be sited.

I doubt that they do. This whole thing looks to me to be the imaginary concoction of a particular Democratic party congresswoman.
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#6
No mention of if the DHS map she says she saw was drawn up before the SpaceX site, in which recent surveys of the site seem appropriate.
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#7
(Feb 15, 2019 04:35 AM)Yazata Wrote: I doubt that they do. This whole thing looks to me to be the imaginary concoction of a particular Democratic party congresswoman.


That was the point of placing it in this forum category, of wryly suggesting it was a "theory", motivated by whatever proffered suggestions (like politics). An alternative to the ho-hum situation the facility was otherwise considered to be basking in.

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#8
public drawing of the map might be legally considered privacy breach
thus creation of the map for her might have been bait to try and get her to break the law
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#9
(Feb 14, 2019 08:59 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: "The National Butterfly Center has filed for a restraining order to keep federal agents and contractors — who plan to build a border wall through the popular nature preserve — off its property.

The butterfly center, located in the small Texas town of Mission in the Rio Grande Valley, has tried for more than a year to stop the border barrier, which Congress approved last March. But the current debate over the Trump administration's demands for billions more dollars in border wall funding has focused national attention on the butterfly preserve's plight.

Executive Director Marianna Treviño-Wright said the center's attorneys filed for a restraining order Monday evening in U.S. District Court in Washington because construction equipment and contractors have driven across the center's property even though the federal government has yet to acquire the land. ..."---- https://www.dallasnews.com/news/texas/20...nstruction

Federal judge dismisses lawsuit by butterfly conservationists over Trump border wall

A federal judge on Thursday dismissed a lawsuit from the North American Butterfly Association (NABA) that sought to block the Trump administration's plans to construct a border wall near the National Butterfly Center in southern Texas.

U.S. District Court Judge Richard Leon ruled against NABA, writing that the organization's claims that the government violated its Fourth Amendment rights by entering the sanctuary without consent does not apply in this case, because the amendment “offers little refuge for unenclosed land near one of the country’s external borders.”


Welp, that didn't take long.  Rolleyes
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