Defining spirituality

#1
Many definitions for spirituality. It's hard to pin down such a general concept. What is your take on it?

"There is no single, widely agreed upon definition of spirituality. Surveys of the definition of the term, as used in scholarly research, show a broad range of definitions ranging from uni-dimensional definitions such as a personal belief in a supernatural reality to broader concepts such as a quest for an ultimate/sacred meaning, transcending the base/material aspects of life, and/or a sense of awe/wonderment and reverence toward the universe. A survey of reviews by McCarroll e.a. dealing with the topic of spirituality gave twenty-seven explicit definitions, among which "there was little agreement." This causes some difficulty in trying to study spirituality systematically; i.e., it impedes both understanding and the capacity to communicate findings in a meaningful fashion. Indeed, many of spirituality's core features are not unique to spirituality alone; for example German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (a famous atheist) regarded self-transcendence, asceticism and the recognition of one's connection to all as a key to ethical living

According to Kees Waaijman, the traditional meaning of spirituality is a process of re-formation which "aims to recover the original shape of man, the image of God. To accomplish this, the re-formation is oriented at a mold, which represents the original shape: in Judaism the Torah, in Christianity there is Christ, for Buddhism, Buddha, and in Islam, Muhammad." In modern times the emphasis is on subjective experience and the "deepest values and meanings by which people live," incorporating personal growth or transformation, usually in a context separate from organized religious institutions. Houtman and Aupers suggest that modern spirituality is a blend of humanistic psychology, mystical and esoteric traditions and Eastern religions.

Spirituality is sometimes associated with philosophical, social, or political movements such as liberalism, feminist theology, and green politics. Some argue (though far from universally accepted—see those who espouse secular humanism) that spirituality is intimately linked to resolving mental health issues, managing substance abuse, marital functioning, parenting, and coping."--- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spirituality
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#2
In secular context, I do tend to associate it with feelings of sacredness, reverence, that beaten-to-death "devotion to something bigger than myself" platitude uttered over and over again in television and movies, etc. Minus any specific objects plugged into the placeholder, as which may be the case when contingently encountering someone exercising "spirituality".

Before monothesim gobbled up the pantheon, gods were just various concepts reified into personhoods. So that the more concrete-minded general population could better relate to them and feel that they could be addressed / worshiped to accommodate the needs of the individual and community to deliver more stability to life. An illusion of control. (Crops doing bad? Pray or sacrifice to the god of harvest or weather. Having problems conceiving a baby or avoiding miscarriages? Pray or sacrifice to the goddess of fertility.)

The non-occult version of that drops the personal reification of ideas. But the sacredness traditionally heaped upon them is still there. As well as the mitigated worship of concepts and observance of their taboos that have been systemically extended and morphed into philosophies, thought orientations, political ideologies, lifestyles, fellowships, organized passions or whatever augmented complexities.

~
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#3
"The term spirit means "animating or vital principle in man and animals". It is derived from the Old French espirit which comes from the Latin word spiritus (soul, courage, vigor, breath) and is related to spirare (to breathe). In the Vulgate the Latin word spiritus is used to translate the Greek pneuma and Hebrew ruah."
- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spirituality#Etymology

"Suffix
-al [-ual]
Of or pertaining to."
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-al#English

"-ity
a suffix used to form abstract nouns expressing state or condition"
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/-ity

Regardless of its "secular context" or "use in scholarly research", its etymology has always been pertaining to the state or condition of the action or animating principle of living.

Can't be bothered to use the delete button to remove duplicate topics?
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#4
(Apr 25, 2018 10:00 PM)Syne Wrote: "The term spirit means "animating or vital principle in man and animals". It is derived from the Old French espirit which comes from the Latin word spiritus (soul, courage, vigor, breath) and is related to spirare (to breathe). In the Vulgate the Latin word spiritus is used to translate the Greek pneuma and Hebrew ruah."
- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spirituality#Etymology

"Suffix
-al [-ual]
Of or pertaining to."
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-al#English

"-ity
a suffix used to form abstract nouns expressing state or condition"
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/-ity

Regardless of its "secular context" or "use in scholarly research", its etymology has always been pertaining to the state or condition of the action or animating principle of living.

Can't be bothered to use the delete button to remove duplicate topics?

Delete button doesn't work anymore thanks to your bitching to the moderator.
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#5
Quote:Regardless of its "secular context" or "use in scholarly research", its etymology has always been pertaining to the state or condition of the action or animating principle of living.

Bullshit. When we refer to someone's spirituality or that they are a spiritual person, we are not referring to their "animating principle." We are referring to their ethical and value-based dimension of being including their attitude and beliefs and philosophy in life. The etymology of a word does not determine how a word is used and defined in our culture.
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#6
(Apr 26, 2018 01:46 AM)Magical Realist Wrote:
(Apr 25, 2018 10:00 PM)Syne Wrote: Can't be bothered to use the delete button to remove duplicate topics?

Delete button doesn't work anymore thanks to your bitching to the moderator.

You either couldn't be bothered to try or you're lying. I just created a thread and...wait for it...successfully deleted it.
But since you regularly seem to create duplicate topics, where no one else here ever does, maybe you couldn't find the delete button...already forgot where it was now that you can't use it as retaliation for threads not going your way. Rolleyes

(Apr 26, 2018 02:54 AM)Magical Realist Wrote:
(Apr 25, 2018 10:00 PM)Syne Wrote: "The term spirit means "animating or vital principle in man and animals". It is derived from the Old French espirit which comes from the Latin word spiritus (soul, courage, vigor, breath) and is related to spirare (to breathe). In the Vulgate the Latin word spiritus is used to translate the Greek pneuma and Hebrew ruah."
- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spirituality#Etymology

"Suffix
-al [-ual]
Of or pertaining to."
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-al#English

"-ity
a suffix used to form abstract nouns expressing state or condition"
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/-ity

Regardless of its "secular context" or "use in scholarly research", its etymology has always been pertaining to the state or condition of the action or animating principle of living.

Bullshit. When we refer to someone's spirituality or that they are a spiritual person, we are not referring to their "animating principle." We are referring to their ethical and value-based dimension of being including their attitude and beliefs and philosophy in life. The etymology of a word does not determine how a word is used and defined in our culture.

No, not "we". You, and other secular people (in your secular echo chamber), aren't referring to any animating principle, because you're only playing at spirituality while never understanding it's always been about more than meditation, yoga, nature appreciation, narcissistic subjective beliefs, etc.. How you, and secular culture, may wish to redefine a word to suit your own shallow self-interest has no bearing on what it actually means. Not that you can really be faulted for failing to understand something that seems to be truly beyond your capabilities. Just children aping what they can of adult behavior. Any "spirituality" without respect to animating principles is just glorified navel-gazing.
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#7
Quote:You either couldn't be bothered to try or you're lying.

No dumbass..A sign comes up saying I can only delete a thread within 3 minutes of posting it. That's what you accomplished with your bitching. Now enjoy all the double posted threads..

Quote:No, not "we". You, and other secular people

That would be "we" still, comprising the majority of english speaking people in educated cultures all over the world. Society determines the meaning of words, and that's what this word now means. It has nothing to do with some animating principle or the etymological origin of the word.
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#8
(Apr 26, 2018 04:50 AM)Magical Realist Wrote:
Quote:You either couldn't be bothered to try or you're lying.

No dumbass..A sign comes up saying I can only delete a thread within 3 minutes of posting it. That's what you accomplished with your bitching. Now enjoy all the double posted threads..
So...you can't manage to notice you've posted duplicate threads within three minutes? That's on you, moron. Rolleyes
Quote:
Quote:No, not "we". You, and other secular people

That would be "we" still, comprising the majority of english speaking people in educated cultures all over the world. Society determines the meaning of words, and that's what this word now means. It has nothing to do with some animating principle or the etymological origin of the word.

Really? 80% of the world believes there is a god, and a majority in the EU (51%) believe there is a god ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographi...ism#Europe ).
And it's laughable for you claim society has determined what the word "now means" when you're own cited definition expressly says: "There is no single, widely agreed upon definition of spirituality." If society could tell us what a word "now means", it would be "widely agreed upon". Rolleyes


And as usual, you just ignore all the points you can't refute (because you don't have any basis to even understand them):
(Apr 26, 2018 04:19 AM)Syne Wrote: You...aren't referring to any animating principle, because you're only playing at spirituality while never understanding it's always been about more than meditation, yoga, nature appreciation, narcissistic subjective beliefs, etc.. How you, and secular culture, may wish to redefine a word to suit your own shallow self-interest has no bearing on what it actually means. Not that you can really be faulted for failing to understand something that seems to be truly beyond your capabilities. Just children aping what they can of adult behavior. Any "spirituality" without respect to animating principles is just glorified navel-gazing.
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#9
Quote:So...you can't manage to notice you've posted duplicate threads within three minutes? That's on you, moron.

No dumbass. I'm not checking every thread I post for double posting because you disabled our delete button. I'm just going to leave the double posts there as an eternal reminder to everyone of your stupidity..

Quote:And it's laughable for you claim society has determined what the word "now means" when you're own cited definition expressly says: "There is no single, widely agreed upon definition of spirituality." If society could tell us what a word "now means", it would be "widely agreed upon". Rolleyes

Cherry picking my quotes already? Lets review the crucial part of that quote again...

"According to Kees Waaijman, the traditional meaning of spirituality is a process of re-formation which "aims to recover the original shape of man, the image of God. To accomplish this, the re-formation is oriented at a mold, which represents the original shape: in Judaism the Torah, in Christianity there is Christ, for Buddhism, Buddha, and in Islam, Muhammad." In modern times the emphasis is on subjective experience and the "deepest values and meanings by which people live," incorporating personal growth or transformation, usually in a context separate from organized religious institutions. Houtman and Aupers suggest that modern spirituality is a blend of humanistic psychology, mystical and esoteric traditions and Eastern religions."

Nope...still nothing about some animating principle....lol!
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#10
(Apr 26, 2018 07:07 AM)Magical Realist Wrote:
Quote:So...you can't manage to notice you've posted duplicate threads within three minutes? That's on you, moron.

No dumbass. I'm not checking every thread I post for double posting because you disabled our delete button. I'm just going to leave the double posts there as a reminder to everyone of your stupidity..
Meh, it's not like you managed to delete all the duplicates, even when you could:
https://www.scivillage.com/thread-2671.html
https://www.scivillage.com/thread-2672.html
And:
https://www.scivillage.com/thread-3801.html
https://www.scivillage.com/thread-3802.html
What were those a reminder of? Rolleyes

I didn't disable anything (I don't have admin privileges), and they'll be a reminder of your disregard for other posters.
Quote:
Quote:And it's laughable for you claim society has determined what the word "now means" when you're own cited definition expressly says: "There is no single, widely agreed upon definition of spirituality." If society could tell us what a word "now means", it would be "widely agreed upon".  Rolleyes

Cherry picking my quotes already? Lets review the crucial part of that quote again...

"According to Kees Waaijman, the traditional meaning of spirituality is a process of re-formation which "aims to recover the original shape of man, the image of God. To accomplish this, the re-formation is oriented at a mold, which represents the original shape: in Judaism the Torah, in Christianity there is Christ, for Buddhism, Buddha, and in Islam, Muhammad." In modern times the emphasis is on subjective experience and the "deepest values and meanings by which people live," incorporating personal growth or transformation, usually in a context separate from organized religious institutions. Houtman and Aupers suggest that modern spirituality is a blend of humanistic psychology, mystical and esoteric traditions and Eastern religions."

Nope...still nothing about some animating principle....lol!
In a secular account of spirituality, values, meaning, growth, and transformation do not have any source other than the "emphasis is on subjective experience", which is the "narcissistic subjective beliefs" I already mentioned:

(Apr 26, 2018 04:19 AM)Syne Wrote: You...aren't referring to any animating principle, because you're only playing at spirituality while never understanding it's always been about more than meditation, yoga, nature appreciation, narcissistic subjective beliefs, etc.. How you, and secular culture, may wish to redefine a word to suit your own shallow self-interest has no bearing on what it actually means. Not that you can really be faulted for failing to understand something that seems to be truly beyond your capabilities. Just children aping what they can of adult behavior. Any "spirituality" without respect to animating principles is just glorified navel-gazing.

Your arduous avoidance of only accentuates your lack of refute. Rolleyes
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