Single molecule linked to anxiety disorders

#11
(Sep 11, 2019 03:23 AM)Magical Realist Wrote:
(Sep 11, 2019 03:06 AM)Syne Wrote: Again, YOU are the only one here talking about morality. It's like you're projecting your own insecurity ("don't judge me") and then using it as a straw man to attack me personally. No one said anything against therapy either. And your own OP article says medication can't completely control symptoms: "Current treatments work for only a subset of people and often only partially relieve symptoms." So, no, this article explicitly doesn't prove that "it can be controlled, thru medication". You need to work on your reading some more.

The fact remains that mental illness CAN be controlled thru medication and therapy. So you are wrong to assert that it is uncontrollable like demon possession.
Again, "only a subset of people and often only partially relieve symptoms". If you want to pretend that's actual control, I guess that's your prerogative.

Quote:
Quote:So, no, this article explicitly doesn't prove that "it can be controlled, thru medication".

How else would one get a molecule into one's brain?
Um, no one questioned/argued how manipulating a molecule in the body would be done. Huh
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#12
Quote:Again, "only a subset of people and often only partially relieve symptoms". If you want to pretend that's actual control, I guess that's your prerogative.

Any relief of symptoms is control over the disorder. It's certainly not less control.

Quote:Um, no one questioned/argued how manipulating a molecule in the body would be done.

You did by saying the article doesn't suggest medication. Ofcourse it does. The discovery suggests the delivery of the molecule to the brain can relieve the symptoms of anxiety disorders. All that needs to be done now is to create a medication that can do that.
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#13
(Sep 11, 2019 04:00 AM)Magical Realist Wrote:
Quote:Again, "only a subset of people and often only partially relieve symptoms". If you want to pretend that's actual control, I guess that's your prerogative.

Any relief of symptoms is control over the disorder. It's certainly not less control.
Treating symptoms is a temporary measure, not control of its etiology. But like I said, call it what you like.

Quote:
Quote:Um, no one questioned/argued how manipulating a molecule in the body would be done.

You did by saying the article doesn't suggest medication. Ofcourse it does. The discovery suggests the delivery of the molecule to the brain can relieve the symptoms of anxiety disorders. All that needs to be done now is to create a medication that can do that.

Where do you imagine I said that? O_o

I said 'this article explicitly doesn't prove that "it can be controlled, thru medication"'. If you want to accept masking symptoms as control, that's your business, but I never said anything about there not being a possible medication...much less that the article said so. That's why we're talking about "control".
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#14
(Sep 10, 2019 11:03 PM)Syne Wrote: More people looking for things to blame for their personal problems.

Are you saying that you believe that a weak personality causes depression?
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#15
(Sep 12, 2019 12:20 AM)Secular Sanity Wrote:
(Sep 10, 2019 11:03 PM)Syne Wrote: More people looking for things to blame for their personal problems.

Are you saying that you believe that a weak personality causes depression?

No, there are many factors, including circumstances, but not likely a single cause susceptible to a magic bullet.

Teens who don’t date may be more well-adjusted and less depressed, new study finds
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#16
(Sep 10, 2019 06:41 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20...161816.htm

"Boosting a single molecule in the brain can change "dispositional anxiety," the tendency to perceive many situations as threatening, in nonhuman primates, researchers from the University of California, Davis, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found.

That's very hopeful news, for those who suffer from anxiety.

Quote:The finding provides hope for new strategies focused on intervening early in life to treat people at risk for anxiety disorders, depression and related substance abuse. Current treatments work for only a subset of people and often only partially relieve symptoms.

That will probably be the case here too. (It would be great if somebody found a magic-bullet that simply made anxiety go away.) Unlikely though, since the brain events underlying this are probably pretty complex and not just a function of a single chemical.

Quote:"There are millions of people worldwide who suffer from debilitating anxiety and depressive disorders," said Andrew Fox, an assistant professor in the UC Davis Department of Psychology and a researcher at the California National Primate Research Center."These disorders are also some of the leading causes of disability and days lost to disability."

And many people practice avoidant behaviors. They avoid public speaking, they avoid meeting strangers, and end up stunting their careers and social lives as a result.

Quote:Fox co-led the study with Tade Souaiaia of the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center. Ned Kalin, chair of psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, is also a corresponding author on the study published August 15 in the journal Biological Psychiatry.

Some people seem to object to the whole idea of biological psychiatry. As for me, I'm inclined to think that will be where most of our future psychiatric advances will come from.

Quote:Anxiety disorders often emerge around adolescence and can continue to affect people for most of their lives. Currently, researchers can identify children who display an extreme anxious or inhibited temperament; these young people are at risk to develop stress-related psychopathologies as they transition to adulthood.

It's very common.

Quote:The researchers used an altered virus to boost levels of neurotrophin-3 in the dorsal amygdala of juvenile rhesus macaques. They found that the increase of neurotrophin-3 in the dorsal amygdala lead to a decrease in anxiety-related behaviors, particularly behaviors associated with inhibition, a core feature of the early-life risk for developing anxiety disorders in humans. Subsequent brain imaging studies of these animals found that neurotrophin-3 changed activity throughout the distributed brain regions that contribute to anxiety.

The obvious question is what kind of effects would it have on human beings treated the same way.
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