Sports Illustrated model makes history wearing first ever hijab and burkini

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#2
(Apr 30, 2019 02:40 PM)Leigha Wrote: https://www.cnn.com/style/article/halima...index.html

Thought this was interesting, and I'm glad to see SI embracing diversity.

I liked the CNN clickbait story on the side. Paris Museum Opens Its Doors to Nudists. Whatever floats your boat. 

I've been a basketball referee for 35  years. Recently I've seen more religious or cultural clothing on players, especially the pre High School kids. Some of it is actually illegal by rules but you won't find me or any of my peers enforcing it. The rules are there as a safety measure, so eventually someone will get hurt and a referee will be named in a lawsuit because of knowingly breaking a rule. I didn't write the rules, my opinion on them doesn't matter, ignoring them does. I pay a low insurance premium now but all it takes is one incident and that's gone forever. I would have thought by now the insurance companies would be out there warning us about intentionally neglecting rules but I've never heard anything. I think as referees we're more afraid of the political/religious backlash and angry parents/fans than legalities. FIBA, international basketball's governing body and rules author just this year got around to legalizing certain headwear. Still if we judge it to be dangerous for any player, including the wearer, we are supposed to disallow it. 

I really don't think wearing all that clothing is good for an athlete. Never seen a player wearing all that clothing in a game do exceptionally well or get better at the game. Maybe inhibiting athletic endeavour with clothing, a person will have trouble improving to a higher competitive level. Always an exception of course. I see the same kids as they grow older and have never seen any yet wearing as much clothing as they did when younger. Perhaps parents have more control over a 8-12 year old than a kid in their teens, idk. And I really don't care what they wear, I just wish the rules were a little more explicit than having the referee interpreting legalities. 

For instance it used to be illegal for a player to wear a Medical Alert bracelet because it was considered jewellery. No referee wanted to enforce that rule either. Few years ago it was allowed (but taped to wrist) and today it is recommended that the bracelet be left at the scorer's table or team bench. As officials we try to encourage leaving medical bracelets with coach or scorers because we know we're playing with fire should someone get their finger caught under one and suffer a bad injury. Not suggesting players leave their cultural clothing on the sidelines but at least give us the option of recommending it, just for a little protection from lawyers.
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#3
Boy! I hear ya, Zinman. 

My oldest son is a machinist and welder. He promised to teach me how to use a grinder. I was so excited. I ran in and threw on some old work cloths—an old hoodie (with cords), and grabbed my gloves. I have long hair, too. He took one look at me and told me that I had to watch an instructional video first. It was a video showing a woman being scalped after getting her hair caught in a power tool. It was horrible. I quickly changed my shirt and threw my hair up in a bun.

I noticed the other day that someone created a safe silicone wedding band for active men and women. Not a bad idea.
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#4
(Apr 30, 2019 05:11 PM)Secular Sanity Wrote: Boy! I hear ya, Zinman. 

My oldest son is a machinist and welder. He promised to teach me how to use a grinder. I was so excited. I ran in and threw on some old work cloths—an old hoodie (with cords), and grabbed my gloves. I have long hair, too. He took one look at me and told me that I had to watch an instructional video first. It was a video showing a woman being scalped after getting her hair caught in a power tool. It was horrible. I quickly changed my shirt and threw my hair up in a bun.

Happened at a local Go-Kart track in Niagara Falls a few years ago. A young lady got scalped when her hair caught in motor. She survived and I think doctors managed to save a good portion of her scalp. 

Sometimes safety gets shoved aside with certain apparel. Jewelry is apt to get caught in moving machinery so just because it’s cultural or religious doesn’t mean it’s safe. Cleaning girl at my old office ignored a small paper shredder near my waste basket, bent over to pick it up and neck chain she was wearing fell into the blades, turning on machine and reeled her in before jamming. She was lucky.

Think men get a bad wrap for liking scantily clad women? I mean I’m not the one posing. Are there women’s groups targeting the models, centrefolds etc?
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#5
Good point, Z. I'm liking what SI did based on its display of diversity, and the hijab is a controversial ''symbol'' in the US. Many feminists see it as a way for middle eastern/Muslim men to oppress their women, but I have quite a few Muslim friends who believe it liberates them.
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#6
(Apr 30, 2019 06:04 PM)Leigha Wrote: Good point, Z. I'm liking what SI did based on its display of diversity, and the hijab is a controversial ''symbol'' in the US. Many feminists see it as a way for middle eastern/Muslim men to oppress their women, but I have quite a few Muslim friends who believe it liberates them.

In the early 1900’s women wore about the same amount of clothing to the beach our Muslim model had in the SI shoot. I’m only judging that by some olde photos I’ve seen. What sort of pressure, if that’s what you call it, did women feel to wear less to the beach as time went on? 

First thing I notice is that photography was in it infancy and as it progressed, beach apparel became more optional. Are the two related? Did women pay more attention to their appearance or to attracting a mate at this time? Men were just being men, you women start taking your clothes off and we get more interested. How blame for that habit gets dumped in a guy’s lap is a mystery to me. 

Is SI’s male Muslim readership taking their copy to the bathroom and spanking the monkey? Maybe they welcome this photo shoot more than anybody. You may have it all wrong. These swimsuit photos aren’t about being the first SI Muslim gal, it’s about taking the most provocative beach photo the clothing allows. Until now, what’s the most alluring full body shot you’ve ever seen of a Muslim woman wearing the full get up? Personally, I’d say the SI photos are it. Angel
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#7
(Apr 30, 2019 06:04 PM)Leigha Wrote: Many feminists see it [the hijab] as a way for middle eastern/Muslim men to oppress their women, but I have quite a few Muslim friends who believe it liberates them.

Lingering second-wave or radical feminists, perhaps. But third-wave feminists (influenced by residual postmodernism trends and inclusiveness) are prone to being talked into or accepting of a potential jumbled mix of conflicting views. Including an ironic idea that wearing Islamic apparel is anti-patriarchal, while inserted in the overt claim that such is symbolic of resistance to Islamophobia.  

Maajid Nawaz arguably coined the term "regressive left". It's also been adopted by various positive and militant atheists, who are perturbed by religious promotion getting a backdoor pass and revival thanks to the double-standards flowing from dread of call-out culture or anxiety over ethnophobia (fear of being publicly accused of such fear/hate).

I guess areas wherein any self-marketing of Christian religious identity in the past had either faded away or been curbed back by historic Marxist and progressive influences -- or had never been much applicable therein before, anyway -- could, when now suddenly those areas are allowing or giving blessing to other exotic beliefs, be subsumed by that neologistic classification (depending).

Maajid Nawaz, from Playboy and the False Normalization of the Hijab (Sept, 2016): White religious-conservatism is not often celebrated or glamorized by American liberals and progressives, it is derided. But switch up white Amish or Catholic notions of modesty with brown Muslim ones, take a fashion shoot complete with a graffiti-ridden backdrop, and presto: brown religious-conservative attitudes about hiding the female form in the name of modesty become… progressive.

To be fair, many Islamists and Muslim fundamentalists advocate a much stricter form of hijab and “modesty,” which one presumes would not countenance photo shoots for Playboy. And I applaud anyone who trolls the Muslim religious-police mindset. So, well done there Noor Taguri! I know you will be criticized by our own fundamentalists, and I stand with you wholeheartedly against those female-obsessed Quran-thumpers. Certainly what you represent is a step forward from the austere Saudi form of hijab that includes the full-face veil, and bans on women driving.

But, it is also a step backward from the progressive feminism many Muslim women enjoyed in the 1980s. That was before theocratic Islamism and Muslim fundamentalism began competing over who is Muslim enough. Now, they punish those who dare to bare too much flesh. No debate around this issue is complete without solemnly recalling this reverse trajectory for the rights of Muslim women. In the West, the hijab should be a choice that faces the same liberal scrutiny that all other religious-conservative choices face, which it currently doesn’t. Globally, though, it is not a choice.

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