On Being and Nothingness

#1
What is the difference between Being and Nothingness, as you encounter it in your own experience?

Only when you come to terms with the vacuous nothingness of your afterdeath, can you encounter the exuberant being of your being alive.

The inward darkness is the shadow of the outward light.
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#2
That sounds very Luciferian, MR. Wink

I don't know what awaits after we physically die, but I've come to believe in an afterlife. A heaven of some type. Do you feel that there is only this life, and nothing more after, thus ''nothingness?'' You have it capitalized though, so not sure. How do you reconcile your beliefs of the paranormal with nothingness of ''an afterdeath?'' If we are soulless, what are ghosts?
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#3
(Apr 23, 2019 10:34 PM)Leigha Wrote: That sounds very Luciferian, MR. Wink

I don't know what awaits after we physically die, but I've come to believe in an afterlife. A heaven of some type. Do you feel that there is only this life, and nothing more after, thus ''nothingness?'' You have it capitalized though, so not sure. How do you reconcile your beliefs of the paranormal with nothingness of ''an afterdeath?'' If we are soulless, what are ghosts?

I struggle with the intuition that death is nonexistence vs the evidence of the paranormal. It rather comforts me that we are no more after death compared to the implications of the paranormal. The suggestion of ghosts is that the afterlife is a wild west of wandering spirits both good and evil doing their will with no restraint. I would hope that the afterlife is more than this. If it isn't, that's ok too. In the end I leave this question open, as tempting as it may be to settle upon one answer or the other. I did receive a phone call from my recently deceased mother once, listing her name as the caller on the caller ID of the cellphone I was using. But I remain open. If the afterdeath is nothing, that's ok as I will never know the difference. And if it is something, I will rejoice that I continue to be. It's a win win situation.
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#4
You can not cross a river without first building a bridge, or having the funds to pay a ferryman to journey across it.

The point here is that without either building something, or having a contractor to fullfill the journey implies that there is no destination.

(I guess my view is that if we want something to exist when we die, we have to go out of our way and build it perhaps minduploads or universal augmentation, otherwise there is nothing.)
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#5
(Apr 23, 2019 10:34 PM)Leigha Wrote: That sounds very Luciferian, MR. Wink

I don't know what awaits after we physically die, but I've come to believe in an afterlife. A heaven of some type. Do you feel that there is only this life, and nothing more after, thus ''nothingness?'' You have it capitalized though, so not sure. How do you reconcile your beliefs of the paranormal with nothingness of ''an afterdeath?'' If we are soulless, what are ghosts?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutheranism ?
lol



Quote:Etymology

Luther's rose seal, a symbol of Lutheranism
The name Lutheran originated as a derogatory term used against Luther by German Scholastic theologian Dr. Johann Maier von Eck during the Leipzig Debate in July 1519.[4] Eck and other Roman Catholics followed the traditional practice of naming a heresy after its leader, thus labeling all who identified with the theology of Martin Luther as Lutherans.[2]
Martin Luther always disliked the term Lutheran, preferring the term Evangelical, which was derived from εὐαγγέλιον euangelion, a Greek word meaning "good news", i.e. "Gospel".[4] The followers of John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, and other theologians linked to the Reformed tradition also used that term. To distinguish the two evangelical groups, others began to refer to the two groups as Evangelical Lutheran and Evangelical Reformed. As time passed by, the word Evangelical was dropped. Lutherans themselves began to use the term Lutheran in the middle of the 16th century, in order to distinguish themselves from other groups such as the Anabaptists and Calvinists.
In 1597, theologians in Wittenberg defined the title Lutheran as referring to the true church.[2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luciferianism
lol
Quote:For the 4th century anti-Arian sect, see Lucifer of Cagliari.

William Blake's illustration of Lucifer as presented in John Milton's Paradise Lost
Luciferianism is a belief system that venerates the essential characteristics that are affixed to Lucifer. The tradition, influenced by Gnosticism, usually reveres Lucifer not as the devil, but as a liberator, a guardian or guiding spirit,[1] or even the true god as opposed to Jehovah.[2]




they sound quite the same
imagine the surprise if your uber driver got the names mixed up & you turned up dressed in your toga ready for a night of dancing drinking and nakedness to find pitch fork holding puritans breathing the bubonic plague out both nostrils like a rutting bull.

i prefer the church of responsible heavy drinking & light petting & we all walk homes friends in the morning...
but that takes years of conscious hard working determined emotional evolutional development.
with a mandatory non judgemental policy.
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#6
Being and nothingness and essentially one and the same. Nothingness is only as vacuous as your awareness (being). If you have no awareness, everything is oblivion. If you have awareness, nothingness is a potential defined by your awareness. Oblivion is simply giving up on being. As such, it lends no more elan to life than contemplating suicide...which if anything, is a pale excuse for will and purpose.
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#7
(Apr 24, 2019 01:19 AM)RainbowUnicorn Wrote:
(Apr 23, 2019 10:34 PM)Leigha Wrote: That sounds very Luciferian, MR. Wink

I don't know what awaits after we physically die, but I've come to believe in an afterlife. A heaven of some type. Do you feel that there is only this life, and nothing more after, thus ''nothingness?'' You have it capitalized though, so not sure. How do you reconcile your beliefs of the paranormal with nothingness of ''an afterdeath?'' If we are soulless, what are ghosts?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutheranism ?
lol



Quote:Etymology

Luther's rose seal, a symbol of Lutheranism
The name Lutheran originated as a derogatory term used against Luther by German Scholastic theologian Dr. Johann Maier von Eck during the Leipzig Debate in July 1519.[4] Eck and other Roman Catholics followed the traditional practice of naming a heresy after its leader, thus labeling all who identified with the theology of Martin Luther as Lutherans.[2]
Martin Luther always disliked the term Lutheran, preferring the term Evangelical, which was derived from εὐαγγέλιον euangelion, a Greek word meaning "good news", i.e. "Gospel".[4] The followers of John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, and other theologians linked to the Reformed tradition also used that term. To distinguish the two evangelical groups, others began to refer to the two groups as Evangelical Lutheran and Evangelical Reformed. As time passed by, the word Evangelical was dropped. Lutherans themselves began to use the term Lutheran in the middle of the 16th century, in order to distinguish themselves from other groups such as the Anabaptists and Calvinists.
In 1597, theologians in Wittenberg defined the title Lutheran as referring to the true church.[2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luciferianism
lol
Quote:For the 4th century anti-Arian sect, see Lucifer of Cagliari.

William Blake's illustration of Lucifer as presented in John Milton's Paradise Lost
Luciferianism is a belief system that venerates the essential characteristics that are affixed to Lucifer. The tradition, influenced by Gnosticism, usually reveres Lucifer not as the devil, but as a liberator, a guardian or guiding spirit,[1] or even the true god as opposed to Jehovah.[2]




they sound quite the same
imagine the surprise if your uber driver got the names mixed up & you turned up dressed in your toga ready for a night of dancing drinking and nakedness to find pitch fork holding puritans breathing the bubonic plague out both nostrils like a rutting bull.

i prefer the church of responsible heavy drinking & light petting & we all walk homes friends in the morning...
but that takes years of conscious hard working determined emotional evolutional development.
with a mandatory non judgemental policy.

lmao! SO not the same.  Big Grin You make me laugh, Rainbow. You're...funny.
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#8
(Apr 23, 2019 09:47 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: What is the difference between Being and Nothingness, as you encounter it in your own experience?


It's possible that I've never experienced either, at least in the context of certain interpretations or meanings. The legitimate versions of both would thereby be beyond or prior in rank to phenomenal appearances.

If "nothingness" is a presentation of absence (like empty space, silence, or lack of sensation)... Then obviously it would conflictingly require mind to provide that evidence both in the terms of that experiential blankness and the understanding of it as such. One might call this the misconception of eternal oblivion, which even many an atheist or extinctivist falls prey to (Why we can't imagine death. --Jesse Bering).

We also tend to conflate "becoming" with being. A pure form of the latter would actually be substantive, unchanging, and complete. In contrast to the transient ethereality and incompleteness of the former (an immediate condition couldn't even be declared "real" before it would already be annihilated and replaced by another).

But each can apparently cohabit with the other in mongrelized fashion.

If embedded in [stable] existence along with comcomitancy to repeating brain structure, "becoming" would just be our experiences themselves or the division of a lifetime's stretch of consciousness into (subjectively) isolated cognitions of distinct differences, relationally connected in series.

If the reverse of substantive existence falling out of a process (i.e., "becoming"), the latter changes would be collectively preserved as a growing "past" rather than each otherwise receiving a mere attosecond (or "shorter") of being/duration and then extinction.

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#9
As far as I can tell.....I am my parent's afterlife.
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#10
(Apr 23, 2019 09:47 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: Only when you come to terms with the vacuous nothingness of your afterdeath, can you encounter the exuberant being of your being alive.

The inward darkness is the shadow of the outward light.


One thing about genuine "nothingness" as absence of even blankness and its cognition, is that it does make the perfect conjunctive nexus to another island of consciousness. One's experiences incrementally arose from that phenomenal desert during fetal development, and returning to that emptiness and lack of identity via death is arguably a repeat (but necessarily of the same life). No baggage, like memory or other information, is brought along in the transition, so there are no violations of natural conventions.

In actuality, however, it would be more like one light bulb in a vast complex of them going out, with that remaining complex always having been what experience is in general. Instead of a transition, after death "you" would already find "yourself' associated with an already in progress, still enduring body and personal life which likewise considered itself to be consciously isolated from the rest. With that "you" suffering amnesia of any prior identity being purely figurative, as it would again just be generic experience taking on another illusion of being a distinct individual (a body's brain limited to only awareness of its own local, finite information processing).

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