More leftist hypocrisy, shutdown edition

#11
Quote:And when told they must wait, many enter illegally. So if illegal entry were more difficult, they would know that they could face a backlog of asylum processing and have to wait in Mexico indefinitely.

They walked a thousand miles thru desert and hilly terrain exposed to crime and the elements. I'm sure waiting to see a judge is no sweat to them. That's how desperate their situations are. They are fleeing conditions of abject poverty and crime in their home country. It's migrate or die for them. A wall's not going to change that.
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#12
(Jan 23, 2019 05:38 AM)Magical Realist Wrote:
Quote:And when told they must wait, many enter illegally. So if illegal entry were more difficult, they would know that they could face a backlog of asylum processing and have to wait in Mexico indefinitely.

They walked a thousand miles thru desert and hilly terrain exposed to crime and the elements. I'm sure waiting to see a judge is no sweat to them. That's how desperate their situations are. They are fleeing conditions of abject poverty and crime in their home country. It's migrate or die for them. A wall's not going to change that.

Faced with months-long wait in Mexico, some caravan migrants decide to go home

TIJUANA, Mexico — Nelmy Ponce and her three children are tired of sleeping on the ground, rain or shine. They’ve had enough of the insults — passersby screaming “pigs!” at them — just because they’re foreigners.

When they first joined, the migrant caravan seemed like a way to escape the precariousness of living amid Honduran gangsters. Now she says it feels like its own kind of purgatory, with no chance to apply for asylum in the United States anytime soon.

“God is telling me to return home,” Ponce said.

And so Ponce, a 46-year-old taco vendor, and her three children on Wednesday sat in plastic chairs under a small tent advertising an option some of the most desperate here are now considering: “assisted voluntary return.”

For migrants who spent two months walking and hitchhiking through Central America and Mexico, it is a dramatic reversal, a sign of how poor the conditions are here, and how surprised some families are when they learn details about the lengthy U.S. asylum process.



Asylum seekers don’t think they can survive for months in Mexico.
Faced with waiting in Tijuana until March, families from the caravan are getting desperate enough to scale the border fence.
- https://www.vox.com/2018/12/4/18125553/b...-illegally



And that's not even addressing whether their asylum requests are even legit. If not, all the waiting could be for nothing. There is no guarantee of their request being approved...in which case they either make the long trek home or try to enter illegally.

persons facing compelling security concerns in countries of first asylum; persons in need of legal protection because of the danger of refoulement; those in danger due to threats of armed attack in an area where they are located; or persons who have experienced recent persecution because of their political, religious, or human rights activities (prisoners of conscience); women-at-risk; victims of torture or violence, physically or mentally disabled persons; persons in urgent need of medical treatment not available in the first asylum country; and persons for whom other durable solutions are not feasible and whose status in the place of asylum does not present a satisfactory long-term solution.
- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asylum_in_...iority_One


If they only face the same security concerns as everyone else in their country, that doesn't count.
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#13
(Jan 23, 2019 06:25 AM)Syne Wrote:
(Jan 23, 2019 05:38 AM)Magical Realist Wrote:
Quote:And when told they must wait, many enter illegally. So if illegal entry were more difficult, they would know that they could face a backlog of asylum processing and have to wait in Mexico indefinitely.

They walked a thousand miles thru desert and hilly terrain exposed to crime and the elements. I'm sure waiting to see a judge is no sweat to them. That's how desperate their situations are. They are fleeing conditions of abject poverty and crime in their home country. It's migrate or die for them. A wall's not going to change that.

Faced with months-long wait in Mexico, some caravan migrants decide to go home

TIJUANA, Mexico — Nelmy Ponce and her three children are tired of sleeping on the ground, rain or shine. They’ve had enough of the insults — passersby screaming “pigs!” at them — just because they’re foreigners.

When they first joined, the migrant caravan seemed like a way to escape the precariousness of living amid Honduran gangsters. Now she says it feels like its own kind of purgatory, with no chance to apply for asylum in the United States anytime soon.

“God is telling me to return home,” Ponce said.

And so Ponce, a 46-year-old taco vendor, and her three children on Wednesday sat in plastic chairs under a small tent advertising an option some of the most desperate here are now considering: “assisted voluntary return.”

For migrants who spent two months walking and hitchhiking through Central America and Mexico, it is a dramatic reversal, a sign of how poor the conditions are here, and how surprised some families are when they learn details about the lengthy U.S. asylum process.



Asylum seekers don’t think they can survive for months in Mexico.
Faced with waiting in Tijuana until March, families from the caravan are getting desperate enough to scale the border fence.
- https://www.vox.com/2018/12/4/18125553/b...-illegally



And that's not even addressing whether their asylum requests are even legit. If not, all the waiting could be for nothing. There is no guarantee of their request being approved...in which case they either make the long trek home or try to enter illegally.

persons facing compelling security concerns in countries of first asylum; persons in need of legal protection because of the danger of refoulement; those in danger due to threats of armed attack in an area where they are located; or persons who have experienced recent persecution because of their political, religious, or human rights activities (prisoners of conscience); women-at-risk; victims of torture or violence, physically or mentally disabled persons; persons in urgent need of medical treatment not available in the first asylum country; and persons for whom other durable solutions are not feasible and whose status in the place of asylum does not present a satisfactory long-term solution.
- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asylum_in_...iority_One


If they only face the same security concerns as everyone else in their country, that doesn't count.

None of which is remedied by building a dumbass wall.

Here's the real situation goin on with those asylum seekers since you're suddenly so concerned about them. Most are still there and applying for work permits in Mexico.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/soc...04ba03f86e
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#14
(Jan 23, 2019 07:12 AM)Magical Realist Wrote: None of which is remedied by building a dumbass wall.

Here's the real situation goin on with those asylum seekers since you're suddenly so concerned about them. Most are still there and applying for work permits in Mexico.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/soc...04ba03f86e

Yes, it is, but it's apparently beyond your comprehension.


From the article you linked:

In Mexicali, the caravan migrants’ decision to stick it out a while longer in Mexico comes with a series of calculations. Some are biding their time, still hoping for a chance at U.S. asylum. Others calculate that U.S. border security measures will eventually loosen enough for them to cross illegally.

And some mistakenly think Mexico or the UN will help with US asylum:

Sergio Tamai Jr. — whose father, Sergio Tamai Sr., created the Migrant Hotel — rallied a group of about 20 migrants to walk a mile from the hostel to the commission’s [United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)] temporary office Wednesday.
...
When they arrived, several migrants seemed unsure of why they had gone. Gloria Hernandez, who with her daughter Jennifer, 17, joined the migrant caravan in El Salvador, first thought the Mexican government might help her win U.S. asylum.


The "U.S. border security measures will eventually loosen[ing] enough for them to cross illegally" would be much less likely with a wall, an thus less incentive to make the dangerous journey. They should apply for asylum in Mexico, the first country they come across. Especially if they're going to be staying there a long time and needing to get work permits anyway.
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#15
Quote:They should apply for asylum in Mexico, the first country they come across. Especially if they're going to be staying there a long time and needing to get work permits anyway.

That's what they're doing. If you had read the article you would have known this. Hence again the total futility of a wall stopping caravans of asylum seekers.
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#16
(Jan 23, 2019 08:03 AM)Magical Realist Wrote:
Quote:They should apply for asylum in Mexico, the first country they come across. Especially if they're going to be staying there a long time and needing to get work permits anyway.

That's what they're doing. If you had read the article you would have known this. Hence again the total futility of a wall stopping caravans of asylum seekers.

Is "a form of Mexican asylum that offers them permission to work" the same thing as permanent resident asylum?
If so, they're all set in Mexico. Why crowd our border?

Oh, that's right. It's not really asylum; it's economic opportunity.
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#17
(Jan 23, 2019 08:25 AM)Syne Wrote:
(Jan 23, 2019 08:03 AM)Magical Realist Wrote:
Quote:They should apply for asylum in Mexico, the first country they come across. Especially if they're going to be staying there a long time and needing to get work permits anyway.

That's what they're doing. If you had read the article you would have known this. Hence again the total futility of a wall stopping caravans of asylum seekers.

Is "a form of Mexican asylum that offers them permission to work" the same thing as permanent resident asylum?
If so, they're all set in Mexico. Why crowd our border?

Oh, that's right. It's not really asylum; it's economic opportunity.

They have many choices for asylum. US asylum and Mexico asylum. Their situation is not as bad as you make it. Moving on..
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#18
(Jan 23, 2019 08:32 AM)Magical Realist Wrote: They have many choices for asylum. US asylum and Mexico asylum. Their situation is not as bad as you make it. Moving on..

Wow, so you really don't think "80 percent of women and girls crossing into the U.S. by way of Mexico are raped during their journey" is a humanitarian crisis. What a callous bastard. Dodgy
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