Diagnosis of tumor by hallucinatory voices

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#2
Wow. The confirming scan almost got stifled by the British heath care system's concern about unnecessary expense. "You've gone over the edge, Doc, humouring this hallucinating patient."

Quote:Because the voices had told her things in the past that had turned out to be true, AB believed them when they said that she had a tumour and was in a state of great distress when I saw her the next day.

In order to reassure her, I requested a brain scan, explaining in my letter that hallucinatory voices had told her that she had a brain tumour, that I had not, personally, found any physical signs suggestive of an intracranial space occupying lesion, and that the purpose of the scan was essentially to reassure the patient.

The request [for scan] was initially declined, on the grounds that there was no clinical justification for such an expensive investigation. It was also implied that I had gone a little overboard, believing what my patient's hallucinatory voices were telling her.

Eventually, after some negotiation, the scan was done in April. The initial findings led to a repeat scan, with enhancement, in May, revealing a left posterior frontal parafalcine mass, which extended through the falx to the right side. It had all the appearances of a meningioma.

The consultant neurosurgeon to whom I referred AB noted the absence of headache or any other focal neurological deficits related to this mass, and discussed, with AB and her husband, the pros and cons of immediate operation as against waiting for symptoms to appear. In the end, it was agreed to proceed with an immediate operation.
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#3
I wonder whether this particular woman's 'voices' were caused by the brain tumor. Did they go away after the surgery?

Unfortunately, most 'voices' that people claim to 'hear' don't have such straight-forward physiological causes.

Wouldn't it be good if all brain tumors alerted the people in which they were growing?
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#4
(Dec 6, 2018 07:16 PM)Yazata Wrote: I wonder whether this particular woman's 'voices' were caused by the brain tumor. Did they go away after the surgery?

Unfortunately, most 'voices' that people claim to 'hear' don't have such straight-forward physiological causes.

Wouldn't it be good if all brain tumors alerted the people in which they were growing?

Yes..the voices went away after the tumor was removed. Imagine a developed teratoma with a rudimentary brain talking to you. It would probably say don't get a brain scan!
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#5

[Image: 48f80319d298a21e545eeabac7795a87.png]
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#6
I don't believe a brain tumour would cause an internal voice. Consider running a computer on the wrong voltage, it doesn't suddenly write itself a sentient program to tell you to adjust the voltage, it's completely out of scope with what is possible.

It's more likely that a clandestine group was using a particular frequency system to manipulate peoples minds (bone reverberation, ultrasound etc), perhaps for study, perhaps as part of a larger conspiracy in regards to manipulation (both foreign and domestic) and they likely found that she happened to have a tumour. (possibly caused by their misuse in the first place. However a tumours density would show up through diffusion from any passive interpretation of frequency being diffused through a biological.)

The problem currently is such groups haven't been publicly identified (In fact the governments don't even currently investigate such misuse.)
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#7
(Jan 8, 2019 04:38 PM)stryder Wrote: I don't believe a brain tumour would cause an internal voice. Consider running a computer on the wrong voltage, it doesn't suddenly write itself a sentient program to tell you to adjust the voltage, it's completely out of scope with what is possible.

It's more likely that a clandestine group was using a particular frequency system to manipulate peoples minds (bone reverberation, ultrasound etc), perhaps for study ...


Philip K. Dick was ahead of his time in terms of construing an orbiting satellite as targeting him with manipulative visions back in the '70s (or maybe it was less specific, his just being in the target area).

Some claim that "hearing things" is rarely persecutory when it comes to brain tumors, which I guess this woman's hallucination would qualify as, unless it reached the point of chastising her for not getting a scan. There's argument that the mode of hallucination (visual, auditory, olfactory, etc) could even indicate where the brain tumor is located. (The clinical value of hallucinations in localizing brain tumors)

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#8
(Jan 8, 2019 04:38 PM)stryder Wrote: I don't believe a brain tumour would cause an internal voice.  Consider running a computer on the wrong voltage, it doesn't suddenly write itself a sentient program to tell you to adjust the voltage, it's completely out of scope with what is possible.

It's more likely that a clandestine group was using a particular frequency system to manipulate peoples minds (bone reverberation, ultrasound etc), perhaps for study, perhaps as part of a larger conspiracy in regards to manipulation (both foreign and domestic) and they likely found that she happened to have a tumour.  (possibly caused by their misuse in the first place.  However a tumours density would show up through diffusion from any passive interpretation of frequency being diffused through a biological.)

The problem currently is such groups haven't been publicly identified (In fact the governments don't even currently investigate such misuse.)

I had to take my son to the airport the other day. We were waiting at Starbucks and there was a guy sitting next to me on the floor leaning against a post. He said something out loud and then apologized. I said to my son, I wonder what his story is. He was mumbling to himself as he typed on his cell phone. His behavior was a little abnormal. He had an expensive cello case, though, and he noticed me staring at it. He opened it up and began playing. I was shocked. He was really-really good. He said that he’s been running from the FBI for the last ten years and hasn’t had much time to practice. He thought he was in a safe zone because he was in an international airport. Go figure. He played some more and then we chatted for a bit. He was from Romania. I asked him about it. He said it was beautiful but very corrupt. Not like here, though. He said the corruption was in your face but here it was sneaky like an anaconda. He asked me if I thought it was dangerous to speak the truth. I just shrugged my shoulders. He pointed towards the ceiling and asked, what if it was the truth from above? Well, you know me, I’m an atheist. So, I just shrugged my shoulders again. He apologized again. I said, No worries. You’re really good. I enjoyed it. He said, No, for my mouth. I said, Ah, don’t worry about it. I enjoyed meeting you.

If it was me, I’d always have my headphones and my phone. That way if you happen to talk back to the voices, no one would think anything about it. They’d just think that you’re on the phone.

That must be so infuriating. I even get annoyed when my son turns on the music in the car and then wants to have a conversation with it blaring. I listened to an audio representation of the voices. I don’t know if I could cope. Is it all the time like 24/7 or does it go away sometimes? What else is there that you can do to distract yourself besides playing video games? Does exercise help?
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#9
After all these years of being in the 21st century, I sometimes reflexively forget and think I'm still residing in the Flintstone era rather than the Jetsons.

Directional sound:

"Directional sound is a technology that concentrates acoustic energy into a narrow beam so that it can be projected to a discrete area, much as a spotlight focuses light. Focused in this manner, sound waves behave in a manner somewhat resembling the coherence of light waves in a laser. When a sound beam is aimed at a listener, that person senses the sound as if it is coming from a headset or from "inside the head." When the listener steps out of the beam, or when the beam is aimed in a different direction, the sound disappears completely."


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#10
Very cool, but does it travel through walls?
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