Religious calling of greatest female mathematician many have never heard of

#1
https://www.scientificamerican.com/artic...-heard-of/

EXCERPT: . . . Born May 16, 1718 in Milan, [Maria] Agnesi was the eldest of her wealthy silk merchant father’s 21 children. By age 5 she could speak French, and by 11 she was known to Milanese society as the “seven-tongued orator” for her mastery of modern and classical languages. In part to give Agensi the best education possible, her father invited leading intellectuals of the day to the family’s home, where his daughter’s gifts shone. [...] Agnesi found a special appeal in mathematics. Most knowledge derived from experience, she believed, is fallible and open to dispute. From mathematics, however, come truths that are wholly certain, the contemplation of which brings particularly great joy. [...] Hers represented one of the first textbooks in the relatively new field of calculus. It helped to shape the education of mathematics students for several generations that followed. [...] Agnesi’s textbook was praised in 1749 by the French Academy [...]

[...] A passionate advocate for the education of women and the poor, Agnesi believed that the natural sciences and math should play an important role in an educational curriculum. As a person of deep religious faith, however, she also believed that scientific and mathematical studies must be viewed in the larger context of God’s plan for creation.

When Maria’s father died in 1752, she was free to answer a religious calling and devote herself to her other great passion: service to the poor, sick and homeless. She began by founding a small hospital in her home. She eventually gave away her wealth, including the gifts she had received from the empress. When she died at age 80, she was buried in a pauper’s grave.

To this day, some mathematicians express surprise at Maria’s apparent turn from learning and mathematics to a religious vocation. To her, however, it made perfect sense. In her view, human beings are capable of both knowing and loving, and while it is important for the mind to marvel at many truths, it’s ultimately even more important for the heart to be moved by love.

MORE: https://www.scientificamerican.com/artic...-heard-of/
Reply
#2
Quote:In her view, human beings are capable of both knowing and loving, and while it is important for the mind to marvel at many truths, it’s ultimately even more important for the heart to be moved by love.

She became a whole person for her own sake instead of half a person for society's sake.
Reply
#3
As always your presence has been more than adequate.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads…
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  NY wants to ban religious vaccine exemptions + UK non-religious figures jump 46% C C 3 279 Apr 14, 2019 06:36 PM
Last Post: Syne
  China: religious leaders to carry religious ID cards C C 0 509 Mar 5, 2016 03:01 AM
Last Post: C C



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)