Stopping the 'humans taking fish medicine' trend

#1
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-na...180964523/

EXCERPT: [...] If consumers are seeing these products in stores, they should be aware that these products have no assurance of purity, safety or effectiveness. The FDA does not have any information about the unapproved antibiotics sold in pet stores because they have not been evaluated for quality, safety, effectiveness, or purity. We strongly advise people to not substitute them for approved products that are intended for use in humans as prescribed by their health care provider....

[...] humans raiding the medicine cabinets of our finned friends is by no means a new trend. As Levy documents in his book, the practice stretches back to at least the 90's. While investigating antibiotics misuse, Levy describes a conversation with a pet store owner who admitted to taking the fish antibiotics for an infected finger—noting that the practice wasn't unusual among other pet store workers.

In 2002, Army physician Brandon J. Goff wrote a letter to the editor of the New England Journal of Medicine documenting an encounter with an unnamed Army Special Forces soldier who came to him with a sinus infection after self-medicating with fish antibiotics from a pet store. The soldier described this source of antibiotics as "common knowledge among all branches of the American Special Forces community," according to Goff.

In the years since, many pet stores have wised up to the trend and quietly removed these antibiotics from their shelves. PetSmart representatives told Smithsonian.com that the company had limited its selection to "fish medication in forms that could not easily be consumed by humans. This allows us to provide fish medication to the customers who need it for their aquariums while helping to prevent misuse." (The company did not say when they made the change and did not respond to a follow-up request.) In the last week, Amazon has also removed these antibiotics from their site last week in the wake of Sharp’s Tweet; the company declined to comment about the move.

Unfortunately, fish antibiotics are still well within reach....

MORE: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-na...180964523/
Reply
#2
(Aug 17, 2017 07:14 AM)C C Wrote: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-na...180964523/

EXCERPT: [...] If consumers are seeing these products in stores, they should be aware that these products have no assurance of purity, safety or effectiveness. The FDA does not have any information about the unapproved antibiotics sold in pet stores because they have not been evaluated for quality, safety, effectiveness, or purity. We strongly advise people to not substitute them for approved products that are intended for use in humans as prescribed by their health care provider....

[...] humans raiding the medicine cabinets of our finned friends is by no means a new trend. As Levy documents in his book, the practice stretches back to at least the 90's. While investigating antibiotics misuse, Levy describes a conversation with a pet store owner who admitted to taking the fish antibiotics for an infected finger—noting that the practice wasn't unusual among other pet store workers.

In 2002, Army physician Brandon J. Goff wrote a letter to the editor of the New England Journal of Medicine documenting an encounter with an unnamed Army Special Forces soldier who came to him with a sinus infection after self-medicating with fish antibiotics from a pet store. The soldier described this source of antibiotics as "common knowledge among all branches of the American Special Forces community," according to Goff.

In the years since, many pet stores have wised up to the trend and quietly removed these antibiotics from their shelves. PetSmart representatives told Smithsonian.com that the company had limited its selection to "fish medication in forms that could not easily be consumed by humans. This allows us to provide fish medication to the customers who need it for their aquariums while helping to prevent misuse." (The company did not say when they made the change and did not respond to a follow-up request.) In the last week, Amazon has also removed these antibiotics from their site last week in the wake of Sharp’s Tweet; the company declined to comment about the move.

Unfortunately, fish antibiotics are still well within reach....

MORE: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-na...180964523/

pieas self promotion of empathy & care in a privatised capitalist market that has no free access health care for its own citizens ?

bit of a punch n judy puppet show really !
timing being when the affordable health care act is being removed by the rich right wing to deny millions of working class access to health care...

i would guess the FDA is bribed to promote what ever the biggest some of money is paying for.


quite a shamelss piece of covert right wing regulation propoganda really.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Booze not medicine for the heart after all, study says C C 4 158 Apr 14, 2018 02:24 AM
Last Post: Syne
  Will Medicine Survive the Anthropocene? C C 3 490 Jun 21, 2016 07:09 PM
Last Post: elte
  Know it's a placebo? Study shows the 'medicine' could still work C C 0 373 Jul 26, 2015 06:26 AM
Last Post: C C



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)