The world's first Christian (missionary) airline: Judah 1

#1
C C Offline
https://onemileatatime.com/judah-1-christian-airline/

EXCERPTS: Over the years we’ve seen a few religious airlines emerge. They’ve almost all failed. The reason they’ve failed seems obvious enough — most religious people don’t have needs so specific that it’s worth tailoring an airline to them while alienating a large percentage of your potential customer base. [...] we haven’t yet seen a Christian one (unless we’re talking about all the prosperity gospel ministers with private jets).

About two years ago, in late 2018, plans were announced for the world’s first Christian airline, and it looks like that’s now closer to becoming a reality. [...] Judah 1, the world’s first Christian airline, with the slogan “Your Hands, God’s LOVE, Our Wings.” ... Judah 1 has already operated some private flights for small groups of missionaries to disaster areas and mission fields, but in 2021 Judah 1 plans on becoming a “real” airline.

Judah 1 is allegedly in the process of applying to become a Part 121 carrier, meaning that it could operate commercial flights. While the airline was initially going to be based at North Texas Regional Airport, the plan is now for the airline to be based at Shreveport Regional Airport in Louisiana. ... For the past couple of years Judah 1 has had an MD-80.

[...] What’s going to set Judah 1 apart? The airline won’t charge luggage fees. Per the CEO: “We will have to charge regular ticket prices just like you do for the [other] airlines. This is not available for just the general public, you have to be part of a mission team. It will be very competitive with the airlines. The advantage is there’s no luggage fees. Absolutely none. All your cargo travels with you as well. So that’s the biggest thing. About 50 percent of missionaries lose their cargo when it travels via container and that’s one of the problems we have. I know some of the trips we have been on ourselves with other missionary groups traveling, they ship their stuff via container and medical supplies and stuff either get tied up in customs, food spoils, some things it just gets lost.

That’s truly strange — 50% of cargo that missionaries send is lost? And what exactly is the limit on how much luggage people can bring? If this airline does get approved, it sounds like it would primarily offer charter service, and perhaps even scheduled charter service, where different mission and church groups can book the same flight. [...] Personally I can’t make sense of the business model. The airline is only targeting Christian travelers, and there seem to be two things that set the airline apart: First of all, the airline will have no luggage fees. Second of all, the airline may sell individual seats or group tickets on scheduled flights to destinations that may be popular with missionaries.

I guess we’ll find out soon enough how this works out. The airline is significantly delayed though ... I’m not going to lie, I sure would love to fly an ex-American Airlines MD-80… What do you make of Judah 1? (MORE - details, images)

Sept 23, 2020: JUDAH 1 (Delivering Life)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afrmM64n870

Nov 22, 2019: Judah 1 World's First Christian Missionary Airline to Carry God's People all over the World

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLRDEScQpvY
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#2
Leigha Offline
Interesting! I’m friends with a few missionaries who have to fund their travel and expenses on their own, often done through fund raising, so this would be more cost efficient. There are problems with it though, as it mixes missions with capitalism. Will have to see if it’s helpful to missionaries or if it’s a feel good/trendy kind of thing and not that cost effective, in the end.
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#3
Zinjanthropos Offline
I'm under the impression that God approves the burning of hydrocarbons (CO2 emissions) & ushering people like John Chau to forbidden and deadly places to get His word across. What is God condoning here?
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#4
Leigha Offline
Well, missionaries traveling overseas have to travel there somehow, but having an airlines “devoted” to religious mission trips, operating as a commercial company (the tendency for corporate greed) sends a mixed message.
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#5
Zinjanthropos Offline
(Nov 20, 2020 11:02 PM)Leigha Wrote: Well, missionaries traveling overseas have to travel there somehow, but having an airlines “devoted” to mission trips, operating as a commercial company sends a mixed message.

Bring them back too. God is big business. Billions spent on Him annually. No surprise here.

From Judah 1 website: 
Quote:The Mission

It was a dream that birthed Judah 1, Inc.  Founder, Everett Aaron saw missionaries standing with their luggage, waiting.  He asked, “Why are they just standing there, Lord?”  The Lord told Everett that they had no way to go.  As the missionary says, “Here am I Send me.”  Judah 1 says, “We are here.  We’ll take you.”

Always a dream. Can't imagine the Lord saying they had no way to go. I'd rather He said, "You take them then"
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#6
Leigha Offline
I think there are mixed feelings about Americans traveling overseas to share the Gospel. My friends get criticism from unbelievers (and believers) that they’re doing it for the purpose of traveling. Or they have martyr complexes etc.

It’s not for everyone but if you follow the Bible, you believe that you’re called to share the Gospel to the unreached. I follow an organization based in India whereby local converts are erecting new churches and sharing the Gospel. Many feel that is a better route than “wealthy” Americans visiting for a few months and then heading back home.
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#7
C C Offline
It will be struggling throughout its run just to stay afloat (may never acquire a "fleet"), so opportunism and unbridled profit goals can be set aside. Conventional airlines are deep in debt -- it's probably a flagellation penance compelling even non-religious entrepreneurs to enter the industry these days.
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#8
Zinjanthropos Offline
(Nov 20, 2020 11:58 PM)C C Wrote: It will be struggling throughout its run just to stay afloat (may never acquire a "fleet"), so opportunism and unbridled profit goals can be set aside. Conventional airlines are deep in debt -- it's probably a flagellation penance compelling even non-religious entrepreneurs to enter the industry these days.

You’d think God might have timed it a little better for this dude. It’s all wrong but if God says go then knock yourself out. From what I’ve read, the CEO will be piloting also. On behalf of all the missionaries who use this airline I hope that maintenance is left up to trained mechanics and not one wing and a prayer.
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