What 10,000 steps really does for you + Meds affected by gut bacteria

#1
Your Gut Bacteria Could Affect Your Response to Meds
https://consumer.healthday.com/vitamins-...46979.html

INTRO: Ever wonder why a drug that works for someone else doesn't seem to work for you? You might want to check your gut for the answer. Gut bacteria that process more than 150 medicines have been pinpointed by researchers, who also identified genes that give the bacteria this ability. The findings underline the role gut bacteria play in how well people respond to medications, according to the Yale University team.

"It is possible that we can use genes or species of bacteria to predict the capacity of an individual's gut flora to metabolize a certain drug," study co-lead author Maria Zimmermann-Kogadeeva said in a university news release. "The work is a first step in identifying biomarkers that could help doctors prescribe the drugs that are the safest and most effective for individual patients," added Zimmermann-Kogadeeva. (MORE) RELATED: Gut bacteria may change the way many drugs work in the body



What 10,000 Steps Will Really Get You
https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archi...le/590785/

EXCERPT: . . . In the past decade [...] another benchmark has entered the lexicon: Take at least 10,000 steps a day, which is about five miles of walking for most people. As with many other American fitness norms, where this particular number came from has always been a little hazy. But that hasn’t stopped it from becoming a default daily goal for some of the most popular activity trackers on the market. Now new research is calling the usefulness of the 10,000-step standard into question—and with it, the way many Americans think about their daily activities. While basic guidelines can be helpful when they’re accurate, human health is far too complicated to be reduced to a long chain of numerical imperatives. For some people, these rules can even do more harm than good.

I-Min Lee, a professor of epidemiology at the Harvard University T. H. Chan School of Public Health and the lead author of a new study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association, began looking into the step rule because she was curious about where it came from. “It turns out the original basis for this 10,000-step guideline was really a marketing strategy,” she explains. “In 1965, a Japanese company was selling pedometers, and they gave it a name that, in Japanese, means ‘the 10,000-step meter.’” Based on conversations she’s had with Japanese researchers, Lee believes that name was chosen for the product because the character for “10,000” looks sort of like a man walking. As far as she knows, the actual health merits of that number have never been validated by research.

Scientific or not, this bit of branding ingenuity transmogrified into a pearl of wisdom that traveled around the globe over the next half century, and eventually found its way onto the wrists and into the pockets of millions of Americans. In her research, Lee put it to the test by observing the step totals and mortality rates of more than 16,000 elderly American women. The study’s results paint a more nuanced picture of the value of physical activity. “The basic finding was that at 4,400 steps per day, these women had significantly lower mortality rates compared to the least active women,” Lee explains. If they did more, their mortality rates continued to drop, until they reached about 7,500 steps, at which point the rates leveled out. Ultimately, increasing daily physical activity by as little as 2,000 steps—less than a mile of walking—was associated with positive health outcomes for the elderly women... (MORE)
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#2
My wife, since I bought her the step tracker, walks minimum 10000 steps a day. In about a year and a half she has dropped numerous pounds and looks fabulous. Maybe not the svelte body of her prime but something she is damn proud of and as for me....I’m not going to tell her to stop. Shy
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