The other day I sensed that I was surrounded by an Infinite Mind

#1
I was sitting in my room in an altered state of consciousness and I could sense a vast boundless thing around me but could not see it. I knew it was the infinite mind of God. An interesting documentary on reality says that the holographic structure of spacetime encodes information on the entire universe. And that every point in space is connected to every other point in space. Fascinating eh?
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#2
Clarification required...... If a mind is infinite and boundless then does that mind also include every mote of dust in both the observable and non-observable universe? If the infinite mind does not include matter then would it have boundaries.
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#3
(Apr 15, 2019 04:48 PM)Ostronomos Wrote: . . . An interesting documentary on reality says that the holographic structure of spacetime encodes information on the entire universe. And that every point in space is connected to every other point in space. Fascinating eh?


The holographic principle is one particular ripple in today's pregeometry trend of the quantum gravity pursuit of theoretical physics. Whatever the elemental precursors of spacetime are, in the recent era they're often taken now to be relationally connected or figuratively sewn together by quantum entanglement. They don't have size, since that would be among the properties which would emerge from them -- they could be imaginatively construed as large as the universe, as much as tiny. Pregeometry was arguably coined and championed by John Wheeler, but others were exploring it during the '60s, in more of a "jigsaw puzzle pieces" way (Penrose, at least):


George Musser: What were you doing in that 10-year period?

Basil Hiley: When I joined him, we had Roger Penrose in the maths department, and we had David Bohm and we had myself. We were looking at algebras; we were looking at general relativity; we were looking at pre-space. Pre-space is like pre-geometry, but David and I didn’t want to give the impression that we’re thinking the same way as John Wheeler is. --The Wholeness of Quantum Reality: An Interview with Physicist Basil Hiley

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George Musser: "The real message of the spooky action is that space and time are not fundamental. The particles are rooted in that deeper layer where space and time don’t yet exist. And that’s the way to explain them. So the building blocks of the world may not be tiny things. What could these building blocks be if they’re not tiny because that’s kind of what we think of as a building block; a Lego is smaller than the thing you build out of the Legos. They may be what seems to us enormous things. Things that span the entire universe and are somehow acting in concert with one another to product these phenomena of space."

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What is spacetime? (Musser): Even theories that set out to preserve a conventional notion of spacetime end up concluding that something lurks behind the featureless facade. [...] Physicists initially visualized microscopic space as a mosaic of little chunks of space. If you zoomed in to the Planck scale, an almost inconceivably small size of 10–35 meter, they thought you would see something like a chessboard. But that cannot be quite right. [...] The thermodynamics of black holes casts further doubt on picturing space as a simple mosaic. [...] The black hole may look three-dimensional, but it behaves as if it were two-dimensional.

This weird effect goes under the name of the holographic principle because it is reminiscent of a hologram, which presents itself to us as a three-dimensional object. On closer examination, however, it turns out to be an image produced by a two-dimensional sheet of film. If the holographic principle counts the microscopic constituents of space and its contents—as physicists widely, though not universally, accept—it must take more to build space than splicing together little pieces of it.

[...] The building blocks of space need not be spatial. “The atoms of space are not the smallest portions of space,” says Daniele Oriti of the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Potsdam, Germany. “They are the constituents of space. The geometric properties of space are new, collective, approximate properties of a system made of many such atoms.”

What exactly those building blocks are depends on the theory. [...] Although the organizing principles of these theories vary, all strive to uphold some version of the so-called relationalism of 17th- and 18th-century German philosopher Gottfried Leibniz. In broad terms, relationalism holds that space arises from a certain pattern of correlations [...] Physicists commonly express these relations as a network with a certain pattern of connectivity. The relations are dictated by quantum theory or other principles, and the spatial arrangement follows.

[...] The big realization of recent years—and one that has crossed old disciplinary boundaries—is that the relevant relations involve quantum entanglement. An extrapowerful type of correlation, intrinsic to quantum mechanics, entanglement seems to be more primitive than space. [...] Several approaches to quantum gravity ... now see entanglement as crucial.

[...] In physics and, more generally, in the natural sciences, space and time are the foundation of all theories. Yet we never see spacetime directly. Rather we infer its existence from our everyday experience. We assume that the most economical account of the phenomena we see is some mechanism that operates within spacetime. But the bottom-line lesson of quantum gravity is that not all phenomena neatly fit within spacetime. Physicists will need to find some new foundational structure, and when they do, they will have completed the revolution that began just more than a century ago with Einstein.

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How Quantum Pairs Stitch Space-Time: It is common to speak of a “fabric” of space-time, a metaphor that evokes the concept of weaving individual threads together to form a smooth, continuous whole. That thread is fundamentally quantum. “Entanglement is the fabric of space-time,” said Swingle, who is now a researcher at Stanford University. “It’s the thread that binds the system together, that makes the collective properties different from the individual properties. But to really see the interesting collective behavior, you need to understand how that entanglement is distributed.”

Tensor networks provide a mathematical tool capable of doing just that. In this view, space-time arises out of a series of interlinked nodes in a complex network, with individual morsels of quantum information fitted together like Legos. Entanglement is the glue that holds the network together. If we want to understand space-time, we must first think geometrically about entanglement, since that is how information is encoded between the immense number of interacting nodes in the system.
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#4
(Apr 15, 2019 09:53 PM)Zinjanthropos Wrote: Clarification required...... If a mind is infinite and boundless then does that mind also include every mote of dust in both the observable and non-observable universe? If the infinite mind does not include matter then would it have boundaries.

I am somewhat unsure as to what you mean by the word "include". Ordinary matter is non-sensory and exists without a mental capacity. What can be said about my experience is that matter appeared not as the primary existence, but the secondary one. The material world appeared to be but a veil in other words.
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