Where Did it Go?

#1
That is, if it went anywhere at all. Talking about my consciousness, my awareness. Had day surgery today and for an hour of my life, my mind was for all intents non-functional. My consciousness it seems, depends entirely on my mind being enabled, not on pause. The whole anesthetic experience tells me that I am just a machine/computer and nothing more.
Reply
#2
Consciousness is only awareness. Losing awareness is on the same scale as becoming unaware of your surroundings while reading a good book. And considering the subconscious and dreams, it's likely we are always aware of something. You may not believe it, because your conscious memory is not flawless. But just like you can misplace your keys, you can much more easily forget things that have no real connection to your waking life. They simply don't fit into the narrative you tell yourself about your own life, and your brain is good at dismissing irrelevant information.

And hypnotic regression seems to indicate that your unconscious experience while anesthetized can be recovered.
Reply
#3
(Apr 11, 2019 02:35 AM)Zinjanthropos Wrote: That is, if it went anywhere at all. Talking about my consciousness, my awareness. Had day surgery today and for an hour of my life, my mind was for all intents non-functional. My consciousness it seems, depends entirely on my mind being enabled, not on pause. The whole anesthetic experience tells me that I am just a machine/computer and nothing more.


FESTUS: "Shhh... Now don't go and get Old Doc and that anesthesiologist feller Stuart Hameroff started a carrying-on and fussin' through the afternoon about quantum horse-pucky..."

(video) "Anesthetic action links consciousness to quantum vibrations in brain microtubules," talk by Stuart Hameroff

(video) Anesthesia, Consciousness, Bohm and Penrose

(video) Consciousness and the Brain, Part One: Possibilities Within Microtubules, with Stuart Hameroff]

Down The Quantum Rabbit Hole
http://discovermagazine.com/bonus/quantum

###
Reply
#4
Quote:And hypnotic regression seems to indicate that your unconscious experience while anesthetized can be recovered.

IOW the subconscious records only experience and not objective events? People have argued that dreams are the sub-c versions of daily events, a condensed account that takes only seconds of real time and can project absurdities while compensating for a genuine lack of information. 

How great a role does the hypnotist play? Personally they remind me of those poor parents of autistic kids who were unaware they actually facilitated the keyboard punching of their children in that famous experiment that went awry years ago.
Reply
#5
No doubt brain is mind and vice versa. However, the idealization of a soul as a precursor to consciousness as in the Buddhist belief remains a possibility. I have no doubt that a generalized intelligence exists.
Reply
#6
(Apr 11, 2019 09:27 AM)Zinjanthropos Wrote:
Quote:And hypnotic regression seems to indicate that your unconscious experience while anesthetized can be recovered.

IOW the subconscious records only experience and not objective events? People have argued that dreams are the sub-c versions of daily events, a condensed account that takes only seconds of real time and can project absurdities while compensating for a genuine lack of information. 

How great a role does the hypnotist play? Personally they remind me of those poor parents of autistic kids who were unaware they actually facilitated the keyboard punching of their children in that famous experiment that went awry years ago.

As far as I've read, the subconscious records verbatim, without the usual filters of conscious bias or narrowed focus. Mentalists can exploit this to manipulate your response and direct seemingly random choices. But the subconscious is stupid and incessantly conflates external stimuli with memory, as part of the survival instinct seeking to alert you to dangers you (or your evolutionary psychology) have once experienced. So your subconscious is busy making these connections all day, and these are where unbidden thoughts come from. But these need to be "exercised" in dreams to keep them from overwhelming the conscious mind. It's kind of like someone starting to tell you a hundred different stories without ever finishing one. Your mind is perpetually waiting for the continuance or conclusion. Dreams give the mind a wait to tie up all those loose ends.

Bad hypnotism can indeed produce fabricated memories. In a hypnotic trance, the mind is very suggestible. Luckily, only about 5 to 10 percent of people are highly susceptible to hypnotic suggestion. A good hypnotist only asks non-leading questions and makes no statements.
Reply
#7
(Apr 11, 2019 02:35 AM)Zinjanthropos Wrote: That is, if it went anywhere at all. Talking about my consciousness, my awareness. Had day surgery today and for an hour of my life, my mind was for all intents non-functional. My consciousness it seems, depends entirely on my mind being enabled, not on pause. The whole anesthetic experience tells me that I am just a machine/computer and nothing more.


There are probably good reasons for considering the blankness engendered by anesthesia to be legit. But people who don't remember their dreams or (thereby) claim they never dream should regularly feel the same kind of shut-down or missing time. Which in their case may occasionally or often be bogus if they actually did dream. It hinges around retention in the brain of those experiential events.

The reverse of which is a problem with NDEs when they're construed as real out-of-body trips. If the momentarily deceased did spiritually flutter off to the ceiling of the operating room or all the way to the afterlife, their brain should not contain any recollections of such journeys when they return. Since the influences of a non-passive "soul" on physical memory storage (as opposed to a passive one that somehow[!] merely copies neural data but never inserts any) could in theory be detectable by science.

Of course, in actuality a total audit of electrical and chemical brain operations -- the tally of all causes and effects -- has never occurred with regard to skull meat, and borders on the ridiculous in terms of literally measuring every single microscopic process and transaction -- so as to "prove" beyond doubt that there are no unaccountable influences from outside the system. It's similar to belief in absolute determinism treated as fact, despite it even being vastly more impossible to measure every single occurrence that has ever happened in the universe and evaluate that all were accounted for by non-anomalous reasons of physics and statistical expectations.

###
Reply
#8
(Apr 12, 2019 04:23 PM)C C Wrote: If the momentarily deceased did spiritually flutter off to the ceiling of the operating room or all the way to the afterlife, their brain should not contain any recollections of such journeys when they return. Since the influences of a non-passive "soul" on physical memory storage (as opposed to a passive one that somehow[!] merely copies neural data but never inserts any) could in theory be detectable by science.
If the soul exerts real free will, then it obviously does have a means to inject commands, thoughts, and memories. And you're kidding yourself if you think science has enough of a handle on the brain to even theoretically detect how a memory may have been created. If you think we can even distinguish between a memory of an experience and a memory of a thought/idea, you're suffering from scientism.

###
Reply
#9
(Apr 13, 2019 01:46 AM)Syne Wrote:
(Apr 12, 2019 04:23 PM)C C Wrote: If the momentarily deceased did spiritually flutter off to the ceiling of the operating room or all the way to the afterlife, their brain should not contain any recollections of such journeys when they return. Since the influences of a non-passive "soul" on physical memory storage (as opposed to a passive one that somehow[!] merely copies neural data but never inserts any) could in theory be detectable by science.
If the soul exerts real free will, then it obviously does have a means to inject commands, thoughts, and memories. And you're kidding yourself if you think science has enough of a handle on the brain to even theoretically detect how a memory may have been created. If you think we can even distinguish between a memory of an experience and a memory of a thought/idea, you're suffering from scientism.

###

Syne,

Your words are concise and understandable. You seem to compare the soul to a computer. This would be sensible in my estimation. However, in order to be felt in the physical self, the soul would have to be physical itself, or supra-physical (a supreme self that exists prior to the material world). I think the term "will" is befitting to describe the intention of a soul. Sensitivity to the soul is an approximation, its calculation variant at any given time. The soul may exert free will, but not in the Physical sense. It is adopted by the body through God as a means to a kind of oneness.
Reply
#10
Ostro still spinning his usual, meaningless bullshit, I see. Rolleyes
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)