The benefits of fasting

#1
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/fas...#section11

"Despite its recent surge in popularity, fasting is a practice that dates back centuries and plays a central role in many cultures and religions.

Defined as the abstinence from all or some foods or drinks for a set period of time, there are many different ways of fasting.

In general, most types of fasts are performed over 24–72 hours.

Intermittent fasting, on the other hand, involves cycling between periods of eating and fasting, ranging from a few hours to a few days at a time.

Fasting has been shown to have many health benefits, from increased weight loss to better brain function.

Here are 8 health benefits of fasting — backed by science."
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#2
I've been doing intermittent fasting for the last year, fasting between 10pm and 2pm. I sometimes miss breakfast food and have to have it for dinner.
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#3
(Dec 11, 2018 08:18 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/fas...#section11

"Despite its recent surge in popularity, fasting is a practice that dates back centuries [...]


What a move up from the erratic availability of food in earliest times, that lack of it could acquire status as a voluntary ritual or practice. Almost as if those minor periods of hunger (distinguished from ones of outright starvation) had to be preserved as tradition / custom.

"Flaherty also exaggerated the peril to Inuit hunters with his claim, often repeated, that Allakariallak had died of starvation two years after the film was completed, whereas in fact he died at home, likely of tuberculosis." --Nanook of the North

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#4
(Dec 12, 2018 03:50 AM)C C Wrote: What a move up from the erratic availability of food in earliest times, that lack of it could acquire status as a voluntary ritual or practice. Almost as if those minor periods of hunger (distinguished from ones of outright starvation) had to be preserved as tradition / custom.

Was the aim of asceticism status? Or did it only have significance when it was the abstinence of something available?
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#5
(Dec 12, 2018 05:10 AM)Syne Wrote:
(Dec 12, 2018 03:50 AM)C C Wrote: What a move up from the erratic availability of food in earliest times, that lack of it could acquire status as a voluntary ritual or practice. Almost as if those minor periods of hunger (distinguished from ones of outright starvation) had to be preserved as tradition / custom.

Was the aim of asceticism status? Or did it only have significance when it was the abstinence of something available?

[1] Continuance into agrarian lifestyle of something already in play during the former nomadic days due to the latter's own circumstances or harsher limitations (i.e., not requiring "going without _X_" to be deliberately invented and a voluntary option, in terms of that earliest origin).

[2] Different and diverging cultures then plugged their own varying reasons into the "why" of the practice artificially persisting or being revived / rediscovered by a community. (Examples: Endurance, self-control, part of inducing hallucinatory "spiritual" journeys, warrior preparation ritual, coming-of-age test/passage, a minor personal sacrifice or penance to appease an irate deity, a group rite for warding off tragedies like drought/famine, cleansing purposes, a component of a holy day's behaviors, etc).

Michal Ofer is one of those peeps with a biological background who drift into industries or professions that advocate eccentric fads like Paleo Diet. But still probably sums up the idea here as quickly as anybody:

On the topic of intermittent fasting, one of the initial and most obvious conclusions one can draw is that our ancestors most certainly practiced their fair share of it, often due to lack of choice. In fact, this is probably the most natural way to eat. Mankind evolved whilst following a fasting cycle. This was not due to a burning desire for a six pack (although they were certainly lean and muscular) but because that is how they lived. The very nature of a hunter-gatherer lifestyle lends itself to going extended periods of time without eating. Going for long periods of time without food, is assumed to have been a typical way of life during mankind’s prehistoric hunter-gatherer phase, especially during cold seasons when food was scarce.

Furthermore, during the day, people moved around from place to place, hunting and collecting food. They certainly did not sit down to eat three meals. They may have snacked periodically on plants, seeds and nuts that were gathered, but they probably did not stop every 2-3 hours to eat. It was only in the evening when, if available, they would eat a large meal which would have consisted largely of foods similar to our Paleo options today.

It follows that the human body, through evolution, would have most certainly adapted to these periods of hunger or fasting. Not only did the human body have to adapt enough to survive in times without food, but it also had to be able hunt, gather, and fight. Hunter-gatherers, when looking for food, needed to be alert and focused. In pre-history, if an individual could not hunt well while hungry they would be less likely to survive. These are strenuous activities for the well-nourished individual, much less one that may not have eaten in three or four days. There is little doubt that evolution would’ve given top priority to adapting to such common and life-threatening conditions and we are the descendants of those who could perform well when low on food.

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#6
That doesn't really answer the question with anything of substance. There's little to no question that our ancestors fasted out of necessity and that humans evolved to face regular life-threatening conditions. But drawing the causation from necessary fasting to its justification to unnecessary fasting is, well, a bit arm-wavy without any real evidence or argument. Where it could just as readily be that the necessary fasting was not justified, other than maybe punishment from a god, and that varying beliefs arose to see a value in unnecessary fasting, as a means to overcome our internal weaknesses.
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#7
I like fasting, from both a physical standpoint, and spiritual. It has many benefits.

Not that excited about doing a fasted workout though, friends of mine love doing that, but I feel a little dizzy working out on a completely empty stomach. I don't need to be satiated, but need a little pre workout something.
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#8
(Jan 18, 2019 04:40 AM)Leigha Wrote: I like fasting, from both a physical standpoint, and spiritual. It has many benefits.

Not that excited about doing a fasted workout though, friends of mine love doing that, but I feel a little dizzy working out on a completely empty stomach. I don't need to be satiated, but need a little pre workout something.

Just a little bit of chocolate can work wonders. It helps stamina.
https://www.mensjournal.com/food-drink/d...nd-harder/
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