Skyscrapers could soon generate their own power, thanks to see-through solar cells

#1
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/06/s...olar-cells

EXCERPT: Lance Wheeler looks at glassy skyscrapers and sees untapped potential. Houses and office buildings, he says, account for 75% of electricity use in the United States, and 40% of its energy use overall. Windows, because they leak energy, are a big part of the problem. "Anything we can do to mitigate that is going to have a very large impact," says Wheeler, a solar power expert at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

A series of recent results points to a solution, he says: Turn the windows into solar panels. In the past, materials scientists have embedded light-absorbing films in window glass. But such solar windows tend to have a reddish or brown tint that architects find unappealing. The new solar window technologies, however, absorb almost exclusively invisible ultraviolet (UV) or infrared light. That leaves the glass clear while blocking the UV and infrared radiation that normally leak through it, sometimes delivering unwanted heat. By cutting heat gain while generating power, the windows "have huge prospects," Wheeler says, including the possibility that a large office building could power itself....

MORE: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/06/s...olar-cells
Reply
#2
Good idea. Use all that bombarding sunshine for power!
Reply
#3
(Jun 30, 2018 08:02 AM)C C Wrote: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/06/s...olar-cells

EXCERPT: Lance Wheeler looks at glassy skyscrapers and sees untapped potential. Houses and office buildings, he says, account for 75% of electricity use in the United States, and 40% of its energy use overall. Windows, because they leak energy, are a big part of the problem. "Anything we can do to mitigate that is going to have a very large impact," says Wheeler, a solar power expert at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

A series of recent results points to a solution, he says: Turn the windows into solar panels. In the past, materials scientists have embedded light-absorbing films in window glass. But such solar windows tend to have a reddish or brown tint that architects find unappealing. The new solar window technologies, however, absorb almost exclusively invisible ultraviolet (UV) or infrared light. That leaves the glass clear while blocking the UV and infrared radiation that normally leak through it, sometimes delivering unwanted heat. By cutting heat gain while generating power, the windows "have huge prospects," Wheeler says, including the possibility that a large office building could power itself....

MORE: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/06/s...olar-cells

Giant huge oil filled penis temples to men may not be quite soo environmentally psychopathic as first thought...
here is why we think you should give those giant penis building men more of your money.

... ?

sky scrapers were probably cool back in the days of Ghetos, but now low income working class are paying for them to be serviced for the rich corporate owners.
doesnt make sense.


environmental sky scrapers.. its like stabbing yourself in the hand just so you can play doctors and nurses with other peoples small children(that you dont know) at a fast food restaurant.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Designed to generate the most unpredictable numbers ever C C 0 146 Apr 11, 2018 07:49 PM
Last Post: C C
  Wooden skyscrapers: The spruce excuse C C 3 276 Nov 22, 2017 05:04 PM
Last Post: C C



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)