Anxiety or Paradox?

#1
Something I had considered before is in regards to Anxiety. Anxiety is something we've likely all succumb to at times, be it worrying about stepping onto a stage or just walking into an office.

The weird thing about such anxiety however is that it does actually subside. Should you decide to grin and bare it, while initially uncomfortable the feeling eventually fades and the future act that was causing the anxiety becomes a past event. Should of course you hid in a cupboard and just wait for the event to pass, again the anxiety fades.

That's two separate paths dealing with one specific junction point where the outcome is the same. So should Anxiety be treated more of a physical effect of a paradox? Whereby it's all about a waveform collapse (the waveform being the cause or effect of the state of anxiety.)
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#2
(Apr 20, 2018 01:08 AM)stryder Wrote: Something I had considered before is in regards to Anxiety.  Anxiety is something we've likely all succumb to at times, be it worrying about stepping onto a stage or just walking into an office.

The weird thing about such anxiety however is that it does actually subside.  Should you decide to grin and bare it, while initially uncomfortable the feeling eventually fades and the future act that was causing the anxiety becomes a past event.  Should of course you hid in a cupboard and just wait for the event to pass, again the anxiety fades.

That's two separate paths dealing with one specific junction point where the outcome is the same.  So should Anxiety be treated more of a physical effect of a paradox?  Whereby it's all about a waveform collapse (the waveform being the cause or effect of the state of anxiety.)

Are you asking if we think exposure therapy is good?  I think so. My girlfriend suffers from it. When we first get together, I can see it. Her jaw quivers and her hands shake.  Fifteen or so minutes later and she’s fine.
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#3
The two possible outcomes of one event may be the same, but the outcomes of future anxious events are not likely to be. Avoidance may actually increase anxiety, especially when it may not be as easy to avoid, while exposure may reduce anxiety, as you prove to yourself that it's not such a big deal.

As an analogy to a wave function, avoidance could be a lack of measurement that allows the wave function to continue to spread and evolve. And facing it a measurement that not only defines its form more clearly (making it a less vague dread) but alters its future evolution.
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#4
Anxiety is an enemy of many disguises. It can be an obsessive thought. It can be insomnia. It can be a habitual clenching of the jaw. It can be queasiness. It can be avoidance of a situation. It can be a restless mania. It can be irritability. It can mask itself in a hundred different ways. The best way I've found to lessen its grip is by opening up your senses. Talk a walk in the park. Listen to music. Take a hot shower. Enjoy a delicious meal. Color with crayons or map colors. Deep breathing and meditation. By mindfully reconnecting to the here and now we ground ourselves and release that raw energy that fuels anxiety.
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#5
The notion of staying in the moment seems to be onto something.
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#6
Casually speaking & without citation.... All I know about anxiety suffering is that it's easy to fake and maintain the charade. Try faking confidence, sincerity, happiness et al and you'll usually leave a clue as to your true feelings. Having people feel sorry for you is apt to get your attention and influence the way you comport yourself with family, friends, acquaintances, etc.
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