Have you ever been openly (brutally) honest in an ''exit interview?''

#1
I've been with this particular firm for about 5 years, now. I love the actual work itself, but the environment is negative and toxic. It just feels like a dysfunctional family reunion, than a workplace, on most days. My boss is the main reason for this, and while I think he's a good person, I think he's a pretty poor manager. 

Anyway,  I'm determined to find a work culture that isn't like this, while I realize no job/employer is ''perfect.'' My question to you is, have you ever left an employer not because of the job, but because of your boss or the environment, and shared your blunt opinions with HR during an exit interview? Or did you simply depart without saying a word, as to avoid career suicide? (I've had one exit interview before, and I committed the sin of omission Blush) But, curious if anyone here was bold enough to share the blunt truth with their HR Dept?

Appreciate any feedback to my dilemma.
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#2
Recently I left a job and the big boss himself conducted the exit interview (they had lost their HR person). My immediate supervisors told me to be brutally honest, and I was. They ended up hiring two people to replace me, acting on some of my months-worth of complaints too late. But I didn't like the work culture there either. As long as you stop short of "f*ck you" (or anything else overtly unprofessional), which I haven't always done myself, you should be fine. But I guess it depends on the profession and how vindictive the manager may be. Some careers rely more on reputation than performance track record.
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#3
That's very helpful, Syne. Thank you.

My manager isn't vindictive or anything like that. It's hard to explain, really. The only way I can best sum it up, the culture itself feels very dysfunctional. Very unprofessional, especially with my boss. I don't say obscene things at work, he does. I don't gossip, he does (about all of us, to each other) He manages by emotion, and not logic. There are days I can roll with it, but I really deserve better. I think work culture is SO important. Even more important than money.

While no employer is perfect, are you happy where you're working, now?
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#4
I'm doing freelance programming right now. So aside from my clients, I'm my only boss. Great work culture! Wink

I agree about the work environment being more important than the money, at least up to a minimum required income. And I would probably have a problem with a manager like that too. HR might even appreciate your honest opinion, that could help keep them from losing good people in the future, or even avoid the potential for litigation. Managers saying obscene things can be grounds for a hostile workplace suit.
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#5
(Feb 14, 2018 01:20 AM)Leigha Wrote: That's very helpful, Syne. Thank you.

My manager isn't vindictive or anything like that. It's hard to explain, really. The only way I can best sum it up, the culture itself feels very dysfunctional. Very unprofessional, especially with my boss. I don't say obscene things at work, he does. I don't gossip, he does (about all of us, to each other) He manages by emotion, and not logic. There are days I can roll with it, but I really deserve better. I think work culture is SO important. Even more important than money.

While no employer is perfect, are you happy where you're working, now?

it is very common in sales type environments.

if they are not going to pay you for the exit interview then dont do one.
1st person to complain in those scenarios usually gets shafted with the blame, unles they gain credit through a legitimate abusive act which gives them leverage.

only way to not destroy your own reference is to make a confidential off the record conversation with an HR boss face to face(that you know already personally).

never over the telephone(they record all calls & will play them back to their boss and the manager you have complained about) and say no to it being recorded in person.
but you are giving the company free money by complaining and leaving.
why give them free money ?
they wont and dont give you free money.

companys that break the rules all the time to achieve their profit usually manage with emotion to control via group pressure.
This allows them to avoid any official inquiry which may uncover the rule & law breaking culture they drive to maintain & promote.

would your boss/company pay you if you didnt go to work ?  no !

so abandon all your feelings of owing him something or owing the company something. those feelings are an anchor around your neck. get rid of it.
(they only care what you think and feel if they can use your feelings and thoughts to make money or avoid expense)

do what is best for you long term.
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#6
Thanks, Rainbow. I'm definitely going to look out for myself for once in my life. I always try to give everyone the benefit of the doubt, but it's not very helpful with dysfunctional bosses. Again, he's a decent human being, but doesn't know how to lead. Anyone can manage, actually...but he's not a leader, and I don't respect him. Once I lose respect for someone, it's hard for me to be around him/her for long.

lol I don't think they'll pay me for the exit interview. Hmm.

(Feb 14, 2018 01:44 AM)Syne Wrote: I'm doing freelance programming right now. So aside from my clients, I'm my only boss. Great work culture!  Wink

I agree about the work environment being more important than the money, at least up to a minimum required income. And I would probably have a problem with a manager like that too. HR might even appreciate your honest opinion, that could help keep them from losing good people in the future, or even avoid the potential for litigation. Managers saying obscene things can be grounds for a hostile workplace suit.

How nice to work for yourself! Interestingly, when I work from home (I do this a few times per month) the work day is awesome. So, the issue really is the in-office nonsense/drama, and when I'm working remotely, all of that disappears...like a bad dream. So, this tells me that the main problem isn't the job itself, but rather the office environment.

I'm a believer in karma though, how we treat people will boomerang back to us...good or bad. He doesn't realize he's only hurting himself in the long run.  Blush
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