Chemical imbalance lie

#51
So defensiveness decays into petulant evasions. Seriously dude, hit some Prozac or reefer or something.
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#52
(Jan 2, 2018 05:29 AM)Syne Wrote: So defensiveness decays into petulant evasions. Seriously dude, hit some Prozac or reefer or something.

You need a new punchline cuz that one's getting old. lol!
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#53
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/study-shows...ion-drugs/

Quote:The percentage of people who took at least one prescription drug in the past month increased from 44 percent in 1999-2000 to 48 percent in 2007-08, the Mayo Clinic reports.
Expenditures on prescription drugs reached $250 billion in 2009, and accounted for 12 percent of total personal health care expenditures.
According to the CDC, the percent of persons using at least one prescription drug in the past month increased nearly 50 percent between 2007 and 2010.
And the researchers said prescription drug spending will only increase in the future.

https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/1...pressants/

Quote:Over the past two decades, the use of antidepressants has skyrocketed. One in 10 Americans now takes an antidepressant medication; among women in their 40s and 50s, the figure is one in four.
Experts have offered numerous reasons. Depression is common, and economic struggles have added to our stress and anxiety. Television ads promote antidepressants, and insurance plans usually cover them, even while limiting talk therapy. But a recent study suggests another explanation: that the condition is being overdiagnosed on a remarkable scale.
The study, published in April in the journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, found that nearly two-thirds of a sample of more than 5,000 patients who had been given a diagnosis of depression within the previous 12 months did not meet the criteria for major depressive episode as described by the psychiatrists’ bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (or D.S.M.).
The study is not the first to find that patients frequently get “false positive” diagnoses for depression. Several earlier review studies have reported that diagnostic accuracy is low in general practice offices, in large part because serious depression is so rare in that setting.


i wonder if any researchers may be able to match the economic situation to the distribution of medications.
the more the public get put into the debt, the more the medication requirements increase.

and

unemployment...
do jobless number increases also match data sets showing equal increase ?

additionally menopause, and greater job technical requirements, plus the requirement of older people to remain in the work place means a far greater requirement economically to maintain a functional high end ability.

unfortunately it appears the current US administration are not interested in womens health care.

statistically the average 40+ year old woman, aside from being expected to have had 2 marriages 2.5 children AND maintain a profesional career that is now into her 3rd profesional role...
the basic finacial need to be almost always learnign a new career seems to not be mentioned in health statistics.

critiquing a Doctor whos worried about a patient going from 1st mention to suicide considering the suicide rate....
i think critics are not very interested in the reality of the responsability that doctors have, to attempt to ensure the life and welfare and ability to maintain an icome of their modern average patient.
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#54
(Jan 2, 2018 05:29 AM)Syne Wrote: So defensiveness decays into petulant evasions.

Or excessive combativeness.

It's basically the flip-side of the very same 'fight-or-flight' response.

It's difficult enough as it is to have thoughtful conversations about interesting topics. When everything devolves into ego-battles, that just ruins it.

RU quoted this:

(Jan 2, 2018 05:41 AM)RainbowUnicorn Wrote: But a recent study suggests another explanation: that the condition [depression] is being overdiagnosed on a remarkable scale.

I think that's probably very true. Health providers and medical websites tell people like me (I'm in my 60's) to contact a professional whenever we feel depressed. I guess that they are concerned about large amounts of undiagnosed depression among seniors.

https://www.cdc.gov/aging/mentalhealth/depression.htm

The problem is that minor transitory episodes of depression (feeling down, a dark mood) are normal and aren't pathological. Everybody experiences them. When I experience them, I typically go for a long walk. The physical exercise almost always raises my mood. (Due to the endorphins that exercise generates, "runners high".) Or I try to direct my attention to something new and interesting.  

Quote:The study, published in April in the journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, found that nearly two-thirds of a sample of more than 5,000 patients who had been given a diagnosis of depression within the previous 12 months did not meet the criteria for major depressive episode

Right. That's my point.

I'm hugely skeptical about the efficacy of 'talking cures' in the more severe psychiatric illnesses. (And yes, I do think of them as illnesses.) I think that the best (only) even semi-effective treatment that we have for these cases are indeed the psychiatric meds and treating-the-symptoms.

But... not every episode of unhappiness, dissatisfaction or foul mood is a major psychiatric illness. Oftentimes they are just part of normal life. And I do think that talking cures (without the Freudian pseudo-scientific bullshit) are effective in these everyday life situations. It needn't be a psychiatrist or a mental health professional either. (Oftentimes it's better if it wasn't.)

Try talking to a friend, to a religious teacher/monk/clergyman if you are so inclined, somebody like that.
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#55
One wonders if there isn't some creative value to depressed states that results in really good writing. Virginia Woolfe, Hemingway, Spaulding Gray, Sylvia Plath, and David Foster Wallace all ended their own lives. Wouid being on antidepressants have mitigated the depth and quality of their writings? Perhaps...in that one is not so deeply driven into that introspective state that easily lends itself to dramatic literary soliquies and poems. But maybe it would still be good writing, only driven more by joy and humor than by tragedy and nihilistic despair.
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#56
(Jan 2, 2018 04:59 PM)Yazata Wrote:
(Jan 2, 2018 05:29 AM)Syne Wrote: So defensiveness decays into petulant evasions.

Or excessive combativeness.

It's basically the flip-side of the very same 'fight-or-flight' response.

It's difficult enough as it is to have thoughtful conversations about interesting topics. When everything devolves into ego-battles, that just ruins it.

Funny that the flight response comes from the guy who always hits first.

Quote:RU quoted this:

(Jan 2, 2018 05:41 AM)RainbowUnicorn Wrote: But a recent study suggests another explanation: that the condition [depression] is being overdiagnosed on a remarkable scale.

I think that's probably very true. Health providers and medical websites tell people like me (I'm in my 60's) to contact a professional whenever we feel depressed. I guess that they are concerned about large amounts of undiagnosed depression among seniors.

https://www.cdc.gov/aging/mentalhealth/depression.htm

The problem is that minor transitory episodes of depression (feeling down, a dark mood) are normal and aren't pathological. Everybody experiences them. When I experience them, I typically go for a long walk. The physical exercise almost always raises my mood. (Due to the endorphins that exercise generates, "runners high".) Or I try to direct my attention to something new and interesting.  

No doubt that's an issue. I wonder how much of the increase in depression could be laid at the feet of MDs prescribing psychiatric meds. Really seems like something that should only be available from a specialist. Exercise, diet, etc. show the same neuroplastic effects as any positive results from anti-depressants. I use redirecting attention to alleviate/avoid headaches. Haven't had one in years.

Quote:
Quote:The study, published in April in the journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, found that nearly two-thirds of a sample of more than 5,000 patients who had been given a diagnosis of depression within the previous 12 months did not meet the criteria for major depressive episode

Right. That's my point.

I'm hugely skeptical about the efficacy of 'talking cures' in the more severe psychiatric illnesses. (And yes, I do think of them as illnesses.) I think that the best (only) even semi-effective treatment that we have for these cases are indeed the psychiatric meds and treating-the-symptoms.

But... not every episode of unhappiness, dissatisfaction or foul mood is a major psychiatric illness. Oftentimes they are just part of normal life. And I do think that talking cures (without the Freudian pseudo-scientific bullshit) are effective in these everyday life situations. It needn't be a psychiatrist of a mental health professional either. (Oftentimes it's better if it wasn't.)

Try talking to a friend, to a religious teacher/monk/clergyman if you are so inclined, somebody like that.

Meds largely only address symptoms, and there's a reason many people dislike such meds. They often report feeling less human. There's also the problem of pharmaceutical reliance keeping people from developing natural coping strategies.

IMO, psychiatric meds are a lot like war. When words fail, some resort to throwing bombs...with its inevitable collateral damage.

(Jan 2, 2018 06:05 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: One wonders if there isn't some creative value to depressed states that results in really good writing. Virginia Woolfe, Hemingway, Spaulding Gray, Sylvia Plath, and David Foster Wallace all ended their own lives. Wouid being on antidepressants have mitigated the depth and quality of their writings? Perhaps...in that one is not so deeply driven into that introspective state that easily lends itself to dramatic literary soliquies and poems. But maybe it would still be good writing, only driven more by joy and humor than by tragedy and nihilistic despair.

The creative value is due to its universality. People are often joyous for a wide variety of reasons, but sadness and loneliness seem to be so singular that its expression is universally and profoundly understood. In a way, it's like an empathic telepathy in its purity of connection to the same feelings in others.
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