Fake hate crimes and sexual assaults

#1
HATE CRIME HOAX: Guess Who Posted The Racist Note At Kansas State University

Kansas State University police received a report on November 5 from a student who had found a racist note posted on his door.

The student, Brodrick Keith Burse III, said in a since-deleted tweet that he returned to his apartment and found the note posted outside his door.
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The note on Burse’s door read: “Beware N*****S Live Here!!! Knock at your own risk.”
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“On Monday, Nov. 5, K-State Police received a report of the note. Upon questioning, the person who reported the incident admitted to creating and posting the note to their own door.”
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As the Fix reported, this is the second hate-crime hoax at KSU in as many years, and the previous hoaxer received no punishment.

Dauntarius Williams wrote the n-word all over his car last year in graffiti and claimed he was the victim of racism. He later admitted he painted the car himself as “a Halloween prank that got out of hand.” Though he faced no punishment for the hoax, KSU police “stepped up patrols,” the school developed a multicultural center, and created two new campus “diversity” positions to respond to the alleged racism.

These two incidents follow a pattern of hate-crime hoaxes perpetrated on college campuses. This reporter has never seen any claim of such a hate crime ever being true. Typically, the hoaxers claim they committed the hoax to “start a dialogue” about a problem allegedly so pervasive on their campuses that they had to fake an incident to call attention to it.

It never seems to matter that every incident of overt racism on college campuses turns out to be fake, the schools still rush to hire more diversity officers (even though research suggests they don’t improve anything) to prove they take the issue seriously. Nothing changes after the hoaxes are revealed.


Many more:
http://www.fakehatecrimes.org/
Hate crime and sexual assault hoaxes

Mattress girl, Lena Dunham, the Rolling Stone story, Duke lacrosse team, Kavanaugh, etc..
Has there been a single national news story of rape or sexual assault proven to be true?
What about hate crimes? All those racist notes on restaurant receipts that end up being fake.
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#2
Yeah, the mattress girl was creepy and then she made that strange porn video right after. WTF? I could never figure out what in the hell was wrong with her. What do you think? Histrionic personality disorder?
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#3
HPD does sounds like a pretty good diagnosis for both hate crime and sexual assault hoaxes. I had just assumed that they were extreme cases of bigoted projection. Not like these women are closet rapists, but like their own hatred can only be justified to themselves if their target is that vile. Faked hate crimes seem a more direct projection of the accuser's own bigotry. And the hoax is an attempt to justify their hatred externally. A kind of "see, this is why I hate them".

I wonder why we only seem to hear about these attention seekers. Certainly we would assume that there are legit hate crimes and rapes for the media to cover. So what is it that real crimes lack as far as newsworthiness? Is it that only the fakes ones serve a political agenda?
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#4
(Nov 13, 2018 06:17 PM)Syne Wrote: HPD does sounds like a pretty good diagnosis for both hate crime and sexual assault hoaxes. I had just assumed that they were extreme cases of bigoted projection. Not like these women are closet rapists, but like their own hatred can only be justified to themselves if their target is that vile. Faked hate crimes seem a more direct projection of the accuser's own bigotry. And the hoax is an attempt to justify their hatred externally. A kind of "see, this is why I hate them".

I wonder why we only seem to hear about these attention seekers. Certainly we would assume that there are legit hate crimes and rapes for the media to cover. So what is it that real crimes lack as far as newsworthiness? Is it that only the fakes ones serve a political agenda?

I don’t know. Maybe they’re the ones that tip off the press. I’m only familiar with the term because I knew someone that I thought might have it. I could tell you tons of stories about her but the one that stands out the most is about a rape accusation.

She forgot that she told me the story before she reported. She told me that she was at this bar and met a guy. They had sex in the parking lot on the hood of his car. She went back to his place and they had sex all night long. The next morning, she had to work. She was leaning over the bathroom counter and he came up behind her wanting more. She said no but he kept pestering her so she let him. That didn't sound like rape to me. She always came up with these elaborate stories to gain sympathy. This time she had broken up with her long distant boyfriend and she wanted his attention. She told him that she was raped and he convinced her to report it. Her plan worked and they ended up getting back together but this poor guy lost everything. He wasn’t found guilty but he lost his job, his reputation, and was forced to move.

I don’t know what the answer is because if we did what you suggested earlier in regards to the punishment, it would discourage actual victims from coming forward.
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#5
(Nov 13, 2018 10:12 PM)Secular Sanity Wrote: I don’t know. Maybe they’re the ones that tip off the press. I’m only familiar with the term because I knew someone that I thought might have it. ...

I don’t know what the answer is because if we did what you suggested earlier in regards to the punishment, it would discourage actual victims from coming forward.

Certainly the press is looking at police blotters that don't require anyone to tip them off. But maybe they think someone coming to them is giving them an exclusive, which would make the press complicit in the lie (like the nonexistent verification in the Rolling Stone story). Although I think mattress girl became viral through social media.

The comparable punishment to the crime falsely accused would require positive proof it was a lie, so legit victims, even if their case didn't have enough evidence to prosecute, would not be threatened. Fraud would have to be proven in court.
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#6
"Reported hate crimes in America rose 17 percent last year, the third consecutive year that such crimes increased, according to newly released FBI data that showed an even larger increase in anti-Semitic attacks.

Law enforcement agencies reported that 7,175 hate crimes occurred in 2017, up from 6,121 in 2016. That increase was fueled in part by more police departments reporting hate crime data to the FBI, but overall there is still a large number of departments that report no hate crimes to the federal database.

The sharp increase in hate crimes in 2017 came even as overall violent crime in America fell slightly, by 0.2 percent, after increases in 2015 and 2016.

[Hate crimes are soaring but many jurisdictions still don’t report any]

More than half of hate crimes, about 3 out of every 5, targeted a person’s race or ethnicity, while about 1 out of 5 targeted their religion. Of the more than 7,000 incidents reported last year, 2,013 targeted black Americans, while 938 targeted Jewish Americans. Incidents targeting people for their sexual orientation accounted for 1,130 hate crimes, according to the FBI.

The FBI has urged local police departments to provide more complete information about hate crimes in their jurisdictions."--- https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/nat...5d02aa4407
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#7
I think if you falsely accuse people of rape or hate crimes (or any crime), or even cause the police to get involved with manufactured drama that could lead to unnecessary investigations by the police, then you should be arrested. Sadly, many people are that lonely and depraved, that they will conjure up crimes and wrong doings against them for attention and sympathy.
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#8
(Nov 13, 2018 12:04 AM)Syne Wrote: Many more:
http://www.fakehatecrimes.org/
Hate crime and sexual assault hoaxes
Quote:Waitress Makes $3,600 in Donations After Receiving 'Racist Note.' Now Her Story's Falling Apart.


In classic times it might be pretending to be blind or crippled -- or today just standing on the corner with a "Will work for food" homeless sign. Whereas faking racism or rape (of the "I'm a victim" template) seem more like one shot attention-prostitution gimmicks. (Though OTOH I suppose such might depend upon how far-ranging the publicity becomes, as opposed to keeping it local and only nomadically moving on when necessary.)

Then there's fraudulent "do-gooding". Not so much a quick money-maker as just ensuring steady employment in a profession; plus there really is a "saint" motivation.

The discredited skill of "facilitated communication" (FC) resulted in a number of false sexual abuse charges against parents and other household residents back in the '80s and '90s. The TV/radio/magazine tabloid culture of the era was already fueling outrage and belief that disabled children were being widely mistreated (the latter was occasionally even portrayed as a cause of autism). Thus caregiving that specialized in message brokering served as the perfect outlet for fervent crusaders who wanted to contribute their part for social salvation and domestic policing.

~
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