Corporate gay pride..

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#2
I just don't know.
Somewhere around 1983 someone I knew fairly well was walking down a road.
As sometimes happens a yob called out to him
"What are you looking at?"
My buddy answered
"Nothing"
The yob continued
"Why don't you hit me?"
My buddy responded with
"I don't want to get my hands dirty."
Up to this point the details are factual.
I don't think I would know or remember the details up to this point if my buddy hadn't been attacked after this exchange.
The point is that random attacks happen in the street.
You can, of course, wear an LGBTQ+ badge and belatedly wonder why the frequency of attacks is higher than random would predict.
I have accepted that there a people who will go out on (say) a Friday night and by the end of the night they will have attacked at least one (random) person. Similarly there are individuals (often groups) who will do between (say) $500 and $15,000 worth of damage (vandalism) every time they go out drinking. In the UK the police take about 15 minutes to respond to any call for help. If the culprits can be tracked and identified by (say) 5 security cameras that is a minimum of 5 hours of footage to be looked at and nobody has the time to do that. So the attacks and vandalism continue much as before the advent of security camaras.
Coming back to where I started - I don't think there's any particular point in marking yourself with any kind of badge unless you want to increase the level of attacks.
I don't know but I suspect..
Every LGBTQ+ battle won that makes the headlines causes a backlash that creates more misery than people just doing whatever they do without feeling the need to wear a badge for it.
Sometimes I feel the need to apologise on behalf of the human race for being one of it.
There is no point of principle in this post, just please stay as safe as you can.
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#3
(Jun 19, 2019 10:40 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: https://www.facebook.com/thedailyshow/vi...g3NDc2MTA/


I suppose by nature, definition, or the operation of their very identity... They are opportunistic little bay windows, potbellies, bulbous tummies. (corporation: 2. Slang for a paunch.)

Whichever way the bees mutably fly, business and its tagalong pop-market culture eventually follow to get their own share of the nectar there. Then garden (fund), promote, and groom that trending source to yield yet more bounty. For instance, and with respect to "grooming/cultivating" -- they gradually trimmed the "scary" stuff away from MLK over the decades so that he'd be more palatable to consumers. Now he's just another fuzzy-wuzzy teddy bear icon like tweaked Abraham Lincoln.

Similarly with the whole counterculture of the '60s -- including feminism being appropriated after the early '70s. But then the latter squirmed loose, yet the industry keeps trying to re-bottle it again, with some degree of mixed success. (Each era of a population group or movement seems to believe that it has only faced the prospect of being "managed" or rebuilt into what business wants during its current generation -- when it has probably happened other times before if they've been around long enough.)
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#4
(Jun 20, 2019 01:36 AM)confused2 Wrote: I just don't know.
Somewhere around 1983 someone I knew fairly well was walking down a road.
As sometimes happens a yob called out to him
"What are you looking at?"
My buddy answered
"Nothing"
The yob continued
"Why don't you hit me?"
My buddy responded with
"I don't want to get my hands dirty."
Up to this point the details are factual.
I don't think I would know or remember the details up to this point if my buddy hadn't been attacked after this exchange.
The point is that random attacks happen in the street.
You can, of course, wear an LGBTQ+ badge and belatedly wonder why the frequency of attacks is higher than random would predict.
I have accepted that there a people who will go out on (say) a Friday night and by the end of the night they will have attacked at least one (random) person. Similarly there are individuals (often groups) who will do between (say) $500 and $15,000 worth of damage (vandalism) every time they go out drinking. In the UK the police take about 15 minutes to respond to any call for help. If the culprits can be tracked and identified by (say) 5 security cameras that is a minimum of 5 hours of footage to be looked at and nobody has the time to do that. So the attacks and vandalism continue much as before the advent of security camaras.
Coming back to where I started - I don't think there's any particular point in marking yourself with any kind of badge unless you want to increase the level of attacks.
I don't know but I suspect..
Every LGBTQ+ battle won that makes the headlines causes a backlash that creates more misery than people just doing whatever they do without feeling the need to wear a badge for it.
Sometimes I feel the need to apologise on behalf of the human race for being one of it.
There is no point of principle in this post, just please stay as safe as you can.

What's this badge gay people are supposedly wearing? And how does it justify getting beat up for it? I've been gay for 59 years and I was never issued a badge. Maybe I pass for straight too easily in public. I don't really go around advertising my sexual orientation though. It's a private matter, as it is with most people. I got called out as a fag once when I was walking near a gay bar in San Diego. Is that a "badge" I was wearing?
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#5
(Jun 20, 2019 01:36 AM)confused2 Wrote: I just don't know.
Somewhere around 1983 someone I knew fairly well was walking down a road.
As sometimes happens a yob called out to him
"What are you looking at?"
My buddy answered
"Nothing"
The yob continued
"Why don't you hit me?"
My buddy responded with
"I don't want to get my hands dirty."
Up to this point the details are factual.
I don't think I would know or remember the details up to this point if my buddy hadn't been attacked after this exchange.
The point is that random attacks happen in the street.
You can, of course, wear an LGBTQ+ badge and belatedly wonder why the frequency of attacks is higher than random would predict.
I have accepted that there a people who will go out on (say) a Friday night and by the end of the night they will have attacked at least one (random) person. Similarly there are individuals (often groups) who will do between (say) $500 and $15,000 worth of damage (vandalism) every time they go out drinking. In the UK the police take about 15 minutes to respond to any call for help. If the culprits can be tracked and identified by (say) 5 security cameras that is a minimum of 5 hours of footage to be looked at and nobody has the time to do that. So the attacks and vandalism continue much as before the advent of security camaras.
Coming back to where I started - I don't think there's any particular point in marking yourself with any kind of badge unless you want to increase the level of attacks.
I don't know but I suspect..
Every LGBTQ+ battle won that makes the headlines causes a backlash that creates more misery than people just doing whatever they do without feeling the need to wear a badge for it.
Sometimes I feel the need to apologise on behalf of the human race for being one of it.
There is no point of principle in this post, just please stay as safe as you can.

like people wearing religious symbols like crosses ?
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#6
MR Wrote:like people wearing religious symbols like crosses ?
I agree absolutely with MR (his post above) "It's [sexuality] a private matter, as it is with most people."
For a moment let's look at
"Five Arrested in London Bus Attack on Two Lesbians" ( https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/07/world...ttack.html )

Let's choose between options
1/ This bunch of yobs randomly attack women traveling in pairs on buses - they randomly asked two women traveling together to kiss. The fact that the women later revealed they were indeed lesbians was pure chance.
2/ Something else.
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#7
(Jun 21, 2019 12:22 AM)confused2 Wrote:
MR Wrote:like people wearing religious symbols like crosses ?
I agree absolutely with MR  (his post above) "It's [sexuality] a private matter, as it is with most people."
For a moment let's look at
"Five Arrested in London Bus Attack on Two Lesbians" ( https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/07/world...ttack.html )

Let's choose between options
1/ This bunch of yobs randomly attack women traveling in pairs on buses - they randomly asked two women traveling together to kiss. The fact that the women later revealed they were indeed lesbians was pure chance.
2/ Something else.

“We must have kissed or hugged or something like that, because right away they saw that we were together, so they came after us,” she said in the radio interview."

Apparently public displays of affection among gay people are badges they wear meriting them being attacked.
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#8
(Jun 20, 2019 06:24 AM)Magical Realist Wrote: I don't really go around advertising my sexual orientation though. It's a private matter, as it is with most people.

(Jun 21, 2019 12:22 AM)confused2 Wrote: I agree absolutely with MR  (his post above) "It's [sexuality] a private matter, as it is with most people."

What? I did not know that. If I would've known that a long time ago, I could have used that as an excuse to not have to wear that god awful long white dress.

I'm not into PDA but that's how I know another man is nearby. It's the only time that my husband ever grabs my hand or puts his arm around me.

Next time he tries that shit, I'll yank my hand away and tell him that my sexual orientation is private. I don't want anyone to know I'm heterosexual. WTF is he thinking?
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#9
Not surprise that SS' marriage is lacking in genuine affection, at least publicly. I wouldn't be too affectionate to a misandrist either...although I'd never put up with one long enough to entertain the notion of marriage.
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#10
I guess when it comes to being straight, it is ok to be public about that with hand holding and wedding rings and sexy dresses (even though lesbians probably wear sexy dresses). But it's different when you're gay. There are people out there who believe we should be harassed and beat up and even killed for our orientation. There are potential discriminatory actions against you with the company you may work at. It is a matter of practical sense to not be open about it to total strangers. Not saying be in the closet exactly, or pretending you are straight, but just being discrete. That's all I'm saying. Save the rainbow flag shirt and pink sunglasses for the pride festival where everyone is expected to display it.
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