Superradiance captured in lab

#1
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20...103246.htm

"An atom gives off energy and causes many other atoms in its vicinity to emit light as well. This phenomenon is called 'superradiance'. For the first time, this phenomenon has now been measured in a solid-state system, consisting of tiny diamonds with built-in nitrogen atoms..."
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#2
(Sep 6, 2018 06:50 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20...103246.htm

"An atom gives off energy and causes many other atoms in its vicinity to emit light as well. This phenomenon is called 'superradiance'. For the first time, this phenomenon has now bean measured in a solid-state system, consisting of tiny diamonds with built-in nitrogen atoms..."

That suggests the possibility of a light chain-reaction. I guess that might consist of a super-bright flash of unprecedented intensity. (Wear your shades.)

Doesn't something like that happen in lasers?
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#3
(Sep 6, 2018 08:38 PM)Yazata Wrote:
(Sep 6, 2018 06:50 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20...103246.htm

"An atom gives off energy and causes many other atoms in its vicinity to emit light as well. This phenomenon is called 'superradiance'. For the first time, this phenomenon has now bean measured in a solid-state system, consisting of tiny diamonds with built-in nitrogen atoms..."

That suggests the possibility of a light chain-reaction. I guess that might consist of a super-bright flash of unprecedented intensity. (Wear your shades.)

Doesn't something like that happen in lasers?

"Superradiance is based on the same basic principle as the laser -- in both cases there is a stimulated emission of photons, triggered by a photon hitting energetically excited atoms. Nevertheless, these are two quite different phenomena: In the laser, a permanent background of many photons is needed, constantly stimulating new atoms. In superradiance, a single photon triggers a flash of light all by itself.

"In a sense, superradiance is the more interesting effect, from a quantum physics point of view," says Johannes Majer. "Today, many novel quantum effects are studied, in which the entanglement of many particles plays an important role. Superradiance is one of them. I expect that this will lead to something new, which we might call Quantum Technology 2.0 in the next few decades."
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