The Aim of Perfection is Unity and Freedom

#1
The following is an argument for partial determinism by another member of a long forgotten forum, not me:

There is a marked difference between absolute freedom and a sense of freedom in the perceptual processing of reality in human beings. The existence of absolute freedom as opposed to the mere concept of freedom is as abstract as perfection in its ideal form. Perfection is the condition whose symmetry cannot be broken and which exists at the end of an infinite number of operations (e.g. PI at its infinith decimal place represents a perfect circle). Absolute freedom can only exist in the absence of choice because choice... can only exist within a system of constraint. That is because human beings make choices based on the interest of self or others for the most part. The act of making a decision is analogous to solving a problem and problems are solved by algorithms. Human beings run their list of choices through some mental construct that functions as an algorithmic basis for determination. The consequent freedom in the outcome of choice is based solely on maximizing utility or best interest. However, there exists an alternate standard measure by which to determine a choice based on two other properties - right and wrong which themselves, are the products of a more universal algorithm that is totally independent of oneself yet, exists within oneself. This algorithm implies a far higher level of complexity and hence intelligence.

The "BEST" choice is supposed to be the one that allows escape from a given system of constraints and hence, freedom. But, the choice itself is based on some kind of interest be it self or other. To give rise to absolute freedom an infinite number of operations need be taken. Whereas, on a finite or limited mental algorithm the outcome is but a sense of freedom. Since perfection is the condition of absolute freedom that would mean that absolute freedom from constraint can only exist at the end of an infinitely complex algorithmic proceedure. Thus, freedom is abstract and independent of the physical self. However, when one's choices are run through the universal algorithm a consequent solution it measured upon the inner conscience of oneself and worldly interests may be placed aside or not depending on whether one chooses right or wrong.
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#2
One of the best ways to deflect criticism on the Internet is to claim you are using someone else's words. The old, "I didn't say it, he did" approach works to some degree. However, if you decided on the thread title then you need to work on that.

Like, where does unity fit in? Wasn't even mentioned, where I could ascertain. I would argue that unity and freedom are somewhat contradictory terms. I would also argue when someone suggests there is an end to infinity. Needless to say, interest waned at that point.
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#3
(Jun 20, 2018 12:45 PM)Zinjanthropos Wrote: One of the best ways to deflect criticism on the Internet is to claim you are using someone else's words. The old, "I didn't say it, he did" approach works to some degree.  However, if you decided on the thread title then you need to work on that.

Like, where does unity fit in? Wasn't even mentioned, where I could ascertain. I would argue that unity and freedom are somewhat contradictory terms. I would also argue when someone suggests there is an end to infinity. Needless to say, interest waned at that point.

The title was my idea. Careful consideration would reveal that unity leads directly to harmony. And freedom would be the consequence.
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#4
"It seems that it is the purpose of evolution now to replace an image of perfection with the concept of completeness or wholeness. Perfection suggests something all pure, with no blemishes, dark spots or questionable areas. Wholeness includes the darkness but combines it with the light elements into a totality more real and whole than any ideal. This is an awesome task, and the question before us is whether mankind is capable of this effort and growth. Ready or not, we are in that process."

~ Robert A. Johnson (1921-present),
American Jungian Analyst,
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#5
Is that perfectly good.or.perfectly evil? Perhaps one can be perfect at being imperfect. Thinking perfect imperfection is something i have in common with everyone, does that make us unified and in harmony?
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