Recreational Cannabis Retail Sales Become Legal in California January 1st!

#1
It's not exactly alcohol, but the principle is the same.

January 1st is the first day of legal recreational marijuana here in California. And this being the United States, how are people going to respond? By going shopping!

It's a local option thing, with individual cities and counties free to approve or reject local retail sales.

The initial retail outlets look to be the existing medical marijuana 'dispensaries'. But some of the cities one would expect to welcome it haven't approved it locally, like San Francisco. But both Oakland and San Jose are gearing up for a retail rush tomorrow. Berkeley is the hotbed, the place that wants to become Northern California's cannabis go-to town. (Most of the Silicon Valley towns around my home haven't approved local retail sales.)

Some of dispensaries are opening at midnight. Others will be offering free food and entertainment. (In Nevada, when recreational pot rolled out in Vegas a year ago there were searchlights in the sky, and crowds so big that they had to block streets off for auto traffic.)

Estimates are that this is going to be huge in California, a state the size of a European country with 40 million people. As new marijuana retailers roll out over the next year, it should be a bigger business than beer by 2019. The state is anticipating a gold mine in taxes.

I'm likely to indulge a bit myself. Maybe not tomorrow though.
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#2
Watch out for the Feds. Sessions has made noise like he's willing to take action.
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#3
(Jan 1, 2018 01:40 AM)Yazata Wrote: It's not exactly alcohol, but the principle is the same.

January 1st is the first day of legal recreational marijuana here in California. And this being the United States, how are people going to respond? By going shopping!

It's a local option thing, with individual cities and counties free to approve or reject local retail sales.

The initial retail outlets look to be the existing medical marijuana 'dispensaries'. But some of the cities one would expect to welcome it haven't approved it locally, like San Francisco. But both Oakland and San Jose are gearing up for a retail rush tomorrow. Berkeley is the hotbed, the place that wants to become Northern California's cannabis go-to town. (Most of the Silicon Valley towns around my home haven't approved local retail sales.)

Some of dispensaries are opening at midnight. Others will be offering free food and entertainment. (In Nevada, when recreational pot rolled out in Vegas a year ago there were searchlights in the sky, and crowds so big that they had to block streets off for auto traffic.)

Estimates are that this is going to be huge in California, a state the size of a European country with 40 million people. As new marijuana retailers roll out over the next year, it should be a bigger business than beer by 2019. The state is anticipating a gold mine in taxes.

I'm likely to indulge a bit myself. Maybe not tomorrow though.

https://californiapolicycenter.org/calif...-trillion/
Quote:California’s Total State and Local Debt Totals $1.3 Trillion
By Bill Fletcher and Marc Joffe
January 10, 2017
We estimate that California state and local governments owe $1.3 trillion as of June 30, 2015. Our analysis is based on a review of federal, state and local financial disclosures. The total includes bonds, loans and other debt instruments as well as unfunded pension and other post-employment benefits promised to public sector employees. Our estimate of California government debt represents about 52% of California’s Gross State Product of $2.48 trillion. When added to the state’s share of the national debt, we find that California taxpayers are shouldering debt burdens on a par with residents of peripheral Eurozone states.
Not included are billions of dollars in deferred maintenance and upgrades to California’s infrastructure. To the extent California’s government has not maintained investment in infrastructure maintenance and upgrades to keep up with normal wear and to keep pace with an expanding population, it has passed this cost on to future generations who will have to issue additional debt to pay for this expense.
just goes to show that Capitalism is a fake ideology sold by those who will simply take money for themselves as soon as they get into power and use the term capitalism as an excuse to deny education & healthcare to those who pay all the taxes... working class.
biggest population out of all the states so im guessing it attracts the biggest number of power crazed swindlers who get into public office and go on spending sprees linign their own pockets with tax payer money.
all those supposedly clever business people elected to run all those Capitalist states...
they are all bankrupt.
its a big con.

only true economy is a mixed market economy managed, run & sold AS a mixed market economy.
nothing elese works and nothing else is honest.
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#4
(Jan 1, 2018 03:19 AM)RainbowUnicorn Wrote: just goes to show that Capitalism is a fake ideology sold by those who will simply take money for themselves as soon as they get into power and use the term capitalism as an excuse to deny education & healthcare to those who pay all the taxes... working class.
biggest population out of all the states so im guessing it attracts the biggest number of power crazed swindlers who get into public office and go on spending sprees linign their own pockets with tax payer money.
all those supposedly clever business people elected to run all those Capitalist states...
they are all bankrupt.
its a big con.

only true economy is a mixed market economy managed, run & sold AS a mixed market economy.
nothing elese works and nothing else is honest.

You obviously don't understand US politics. Californian politicians are overwhelmingly Democrats who believe in socialist ideals. You know, people who hate capitalism. Their state is so far in debt because they've taxed businesses out of the state trying to pay for their welfare programs, like education and healthcare for illegal aliens. I'm sure there's plenty of graft there though.

The whole US is a mixed economy, with both private business and public regulations. Your illiteracy on things you opine about is incredible.
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#5
(Jan 1, 2018 05:09 AM)Syne Wrote:
(Jan 1, 2018 03:19 AM)RainbowUnicorn Wrote: just goes to show that Capitalism is a fake ideology sold by those who will simply take money for themselves as soon as they get into power and use the term capitalism as an excuse to deny education & healthcare to those who pay all the taxes... working class.
biggest population out of all the states so im guessing it attracts the biggest number of power crazed swindlers who get into public office and go on spending sprees linign their own pockets with tax payer money.
all those supposedly clever business people elected to run all those Capitalist states...
they are all bankrupt.
its a big con.

only true economy is a mixed market economy managed, run & sold AS a mixed market economy.
nothing elese works and nothing else is honest.

You obviously don't understand US politics. Californian politicians are overwhelmingly Democrats who believe in socialist ideals. You know, people who hate capitalism. Their state is so far in debt because they've taxed businesses out of the state trying to pay for their welfare programs, like education and healthcare for illegal aliens. I'm sure there's plenty of graft there though.

The whole US is a mixed economy, with both private business and public regulations. Your illiteracy on things you opine about is incredible.


Texas
http://www.usdebtclock.org/state-debt-cl...clock.html

https://www.usgovernmentdebt.us/state_debt_rank

https://www.city-journal.org/html/deep-d...13556.html
Quote:hough Texas has rightly earned kudos for its balanced budgets and its high-powered, business-friendly economic environment, it has an emerging debt problem. From money borrowed to build extravagant sports facilities to rising obligations for government workers’ pensions, Texas’s state and local debt is increasing at a faster rate than its gross state product, raising fears about the burden on future generations. On the cover of a recent report by state comptroller Susan Combs, a young child holds a sign: WILL WORK TO PAY PUBLIC DEBT.

While Texas’s state government debt is relatively modest—just $40 billion, or $1,577 per resident—local government debt is more than four times higher: $192 billion. That’s $7,505 per capita, according to Combs’s report—the second-highest sum in the nation, behind only New York’s municipalities and far ahead of third-place California’s. Over the last decade, moreover, local debt has increased 144 percent, much faster than the rate of population increase plus inflation.

https://www.270towin.com/states/Texas
Quote:Texas’ population has grown rapidly in recent decades, and its 38 electoral votes are second only to California’s 55. The state gained four of these votes after the 2010 Census, and is on track to gain another four after the 2020 Census, giving it 42 beginning with the 2024 presidential election. If demographic trends (e.g., continued rapid growth of Latino population) make the state even remotely competitive, Texas will be one of the major battlegrounds of the next decade.
soo Texas a Clearly Republican state is balooning its debt out of control.

you were saying ?
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#6
(Jan 1, 2018 05:55 AM)RainbowUnicorn Wrote: https://www.city-journal.org/html/deep-d...13556.html
Quote:hough Texas has rightly earned kudos for its balanced budgets and its high-powered, business-friendly economic environment, it has an emerging debt problem. From money borrowed to build extravagant sports facilities to rising obligations for government workers’ pensions, Texas’s state and local debt is increasing at a faster rate than its gross state product, raising fears about the burden on future generations. On the cover of a recent report by state comptroller Susan Combs, a young child holds a sign: WILL WORK TO PAY PUBLIC DEBT.

While Texas’s state government debt is relatively modest—just $40 billion, or $1,577 per resident—local government debt is more than four times higher: $192 billion. That’s $7,505 per capita, according to Combs’s report—the second-highest sum in the nation, behind only New York’s municipalities and far ahead of third-place California’s. Over the last decade, moreover, local debt has increased 144 percent, much faster than the rate of population increase plus inflation.

soo Texas a Clearly Republican state is balooning its debt out of control.

you were saying ?

$192 billion compared to $1.3 trillion. That's almost 7 times the debt with only 1.5 times the population.

Also, most of the largest cities in Texas are firmly Democrat.
"Despite overall Republican dominance, Austin, the state capital, is primarily Democratic, as are El Paso, Houston, Dallas, San Antonio and the Rio Grande Valley." - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politics_o..._situation

Sadly, as California goes to shit, many of them are moving to Texas...and bringing their politics.
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#7
(Jan 1, 2018 06:24 AM)Syne Wrote:
(Jan 1, 2018 05:55 AM)RainbowUnicorn Wrote: https://www.city-journal.org/html/deep-d...13556.html
Quote:hough Texas has rightly earned kudos for its balanced budgets and its high-powered, business-friendly economic environment, it has an emerging debt problem. From money borrowed to build extravagant sports facilities to rising obligations for government workers’ pensions, Texas’s state and local debt is increasing at a faster rate than its gross state product, raising fears about the burden on future generations. On the cover of a recent report by state comptroller Susan Combs, a young child holds a sign: WILL WORK TO PAY PUBLIC DEBT.

While Texas’s state government debt is relatively modest—just $40 billion, or $1,577 per resident—local government debt is more than four times higher: $192 billion. That’s $7,505 per capita, according to Combs’s report—the second-highest sum in the nation, behind only New York’s municipalities and far ahead of third-place California’s. Over the last decade, moreover, local debt has increased 144 percent, much faster than the rate of population increase plus inflation.

soo Texas a Clearly Republican state is balooning its debt out of control.

you were saying ?

$192 billion compared to $1.3 trillion. That's almost 7 times the debt with only 1.5 times the population.

Also, most of the largest cities in Texas are firmly Democrat.
"Despite overall Republican dominance, Austin, the state capital, is primarily Democratic, as are El Paso, Houston, Dallas, San Antonio and the Rio Grande Valley." - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politics_o..._situation

Sadly, as California goes to shit, many of them are moving to Texas...and bringing their politics.

sounds a little whiney...
yet the minority government hold power over the senate & house...
have all the control of all the finances, yet your still whining...

soo your saying george bush junior & senior balanced the books & made a profit ?
along with the control of the senate & house when republicans had them..
now they have both...
still blaming everyone else but your own policys.
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#8
(Jan 1, 2018 06:49 AM)RainbowUnicorn Wrote:
(Jan 1, 2018 06:24 AM)Syne Wrote:
(Jan 1, 2018 05:55 AM)RainbowUnicorn Wrote: While Texas’s state government debt is relatively modest—just $40 billion, or $1,577 per resident—local government debt is more than four times higher: $192 billion.

$192 billion compared to $1.3 trillion. That's almost 7 times the debt with only 1.5 times the population.

Also, most of the largest cities in Texas are firmly Democrat.
"Despite overall Republican dominance, Austin, the state capital, is primarily Democratic, as are El Paso, Houston, Dallas, San Antonio and the Rio Grande Valley." - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politics_o..._situation

Sadly, as California goes to shit, many of them are moving to Texas...and bringing their politics.

sounds a little whiney...
yet the minority government hold power over the senate & house...
have all the control of all the finances, yet your still whining...

No, the majority Republicans have the Texas House and Senate, but your own source said that state government debt (controlled by state legislature) was very low, but "local government debt" was "four times higher". It's those large Democrat cities which rack up that "local government debt".

Quote:soo your saying george bush junior & senior balanced the books & made a profit ?
along with the control of the senate & house when republicans had them..
now they have both...
still blaming everyone else but your own policys.

The Bush family didn't strictly govern especially free market.

"Well, I have obviously made a decision to make sure the economy doesn’t collapse. I’ve abandoned free market principles to save the free market system." - G.W. Bush 2008
And senior notoriously reneged on his "no new taxes" promise.

Anyone can claim to be a fiscally conservative Republican, even if they don't actually govern that way.
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#9
Today's the day that California goes to pot!

Fewer than 100 retailers statewide (all of them existing medical marijuana dispensaries) have initial state retail-sales licenses. Here in the SF bay area, none are in San Francisco (surprising) but they are found in a whole strip of the East Bay in Oakland (long a hotbed of the marijuana legalization movement), Berkeley and Hayward I believe. In the South Bay, San Jose has several recreational pot dispensaries. There are none in the more upscale Silicon Valley suburbs on the peninsula. Berkeley is trying to position itself as the cannabis go-to spot for all of Northern California (lots of local tax revenue) so there are a whole bunch of places there.

A few in Sacramento and in rural parts of the far northern end of the state. Very little in the rest of the Central Valley. Santa Cruz is a hotbed of pot smoke. San Diego has legal dispensaries but LA doesn't. I heard somewhere that Santa Ana has them. West Hollywood (a separate city) looks to become LA's early dope-den. Both LA and SF do plan to allow sales... but not quite yet. (SF is facing lots of resistance to the idea from the politically potent Chinese immigrant community and apparently wants to see how it rolls out elsewhere before they write rules. LA's just slow and disorganized.)

The event had reporters and TV cameras out to cover it, and they are reporting lines in Oakland and SJ. But my sense is that it isn't as frenzied as it was when Nevada rolled out retail sales a few months back. In Las Vegas it was a big entertainment production, with searchlights, booming music and big crowds.

Statewide this looks to be a $5-6 billion industry in the next 2-3 years, larger than beer.

http://www.thecannabist.co/2018/01/01/ca...les/95673/

https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/N...464823.php

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-42532776

http://www.breitbart.com/california/2018...-can-find/
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#10
(Jan 1, 2018 08:51 PM)Yazata Wrote: Today's the day that California goes to pot!

Fewer than 100 retailers statewide (all of them existing medical marijuana dispensaries) have initial state retail-sales licenses. Here in the SF bay area, none are in San Francisco (surprising) but they are found in a whole strip of the East Bay in Oakland (long a hotbed of the marijuana legalization movement), Berkeley and Hayward I believe. In the South Bay, San Jose has several recreational pot dispensaries. There are none in the more upscale Silicon Valley suburbs on the peninsula. Berkeley is trying to position itself as the cannabis go-to spot for all of Northern California (lots of local tax revenue) so there are a whole bunch of places there.

A few in Sacramento and in rural parts of the far northern end of the state. Very little in the rest of the Central Valley. Santa Cruz is a hotbed of pot smoke. San Diego has legal dispensaries but LA doesn't. I heard somewhere that Santa Ana has them. West Hollywood (a separate city) looks to become LA's early dope-den. Both LA and SF do plan to allow sales... but not quite yet. (SF is facing lots of resistance to the idea from the politically potent Chinese immigrant community and apparently wants to see how it rolls out elsewhere before they write rules. LA's just slow and disorganized.)

The event had reporters and TV cameras out to cover it, and they are reporting lines in Oakland and SJ. But my sense is that it isn't as frenzied as it was when Nevada rolled out retail sales a few months back. In Las Vegas it was a big entertainment production, with searchlights, booming music and big crowds.

Statewide this looks to be a $5-6 billion industry in the next 2-3 years, larger than beer.

http://www.thecannabist.co/2018/01/01/ca...les/95673/

https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/N...464823.php

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-42532776

http://www.breitbart.com/california/2018...-can-find/

$5-6 billion Dollars that will be taken out of the black economy and away from funding violent criminals.

plus it will make money for the government
it will create jobs
it will help manage quantitative easing by managing cash circulation of ligitimate working class money.
no panama profit schemes with outsourced labour markets to 3rd worlds paying un taxed profits to tax havens then claiming the national flag as your own and trying to buy your way into politics to steal even more money off the people.

now all they need to do is legalise and regulate prostitution so as to stamp out slavery & slave trading.
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