Blood thinning drugs reduce dementia risk by 48%

#1
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017...tia-stroke

"Blood-thinning drugs could protect against dementia and stroke in people with an irregular heartbeat, research suggests.

A study found that patients being treated for atrial fibrillation (AF) were less likely to develop dementia if they were taking anticoagulants. Their risk was reduced by up to 48% compared with others with the same condition who were not prescribed the drugs.

Scientists analysed health record data from more than 444,000 Swedish AF patients.

While the findings could not prove cause and effect, they “strongly suggested” blood-thinning pills protect against dementia in patients with the condition, the team said."
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#2
Diagnosed with AF 20+ years ago but only prescribed blood thinners  for the last 10. I'm on the drug (Pradaxa®- dabigitran) for life. Some may argue that I may already be demented but my question is, how would I know?
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#3
(Oct 26, 2017 05:05 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017...tia-stroke

"Blood-thinning drugs could protect against dementia and stroke in people with an irregular heartbeat, research suggests.

A study found that patients being treated for atrial fibrillation (AF) were less likely to develop dementia if they were taking anticoagulants. Their risk was reduced by up to 48% compared with others with the same condition who were not prescribed the drugs.

Scientists analysed health record data from more than 444,000 Swedish AF patients.

While the findings could not prove cause and effect, they “strongly suggested” blood-thinning pills protect against dementia in patients with the condition, the team said."

https://consumer.healthday.com/general-h...98742.html
Quote:FRIDAY, April 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) Slightly more than half of middle-aged adults and seniors in the United States take aspirin daily

Quote:In the survey, researchers quizzed more than 2,500 people between 45 and 75 years old about their aspirin use and their health history. The findings are published in the May issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

About 52 percent reported current aspirin use, and another 21 percent had used it at some point in the past.

(Oct 26, 2017 05:05 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017...tia-stroke

"Blood-thinning drugs could protect against dementia and stroke in people with an irregular heartbeat, research suggests.

A study found that patients being treated for atrial fibrillation (AF) were less likely to develop dementia if they were taking anticoagulants. Their risk was reduced by up to 48% compared with others with the same condition who were not prescribed the drugs.

Scientists analysed health record data from more than 444,000 Swedish AF patients.

While the findings could not prove cause and effect, they “strongly suggested” blood-thinning pills protect against dementia in patients with the condition, the team said."
Quote:444,000 Swedish AF patients.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16303692
Quote:Acta Paediatr. 2005 Nov;94(11):1543-9.
Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in Chinese and Swedish mothers: diet, breast milk and infant growth.
Xiang M1, Harbige LS, Zetterström R.
Author information
Abstract
Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) are essential dietary nutrients required for the optimal growth and development of infants, particularly of the brain and retina. It is important for exclusively breastfed infants to receive milk of a correct balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. In this study, we compared the composition of LC-PUFAs in the diet and milk of mothers and their infants' growth between Chinese and Swedish. Twenty-three and 19 mother-term infant pairs from a rural area of northern Beijing, China, and Stockholm, Sweden, who were 3 mo old and exclusively breastfed, were studied. The Chinese diet was higher in carbohydrate (17% of energy) but lower in protein (4% of energy) and fat (12% of energy) than the Swedish diet. The intake of Chinese mothers contained more linoleic acid (LA, C(18 ratio 2 omega-6)) and less arachidonic acid (AA, C(20 ratio 4 omega-6)), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C(20 ratio 5 omega-3)) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C(22 ratio 6 omega-3)) than that of Swedish mothers. The breast milk of the Chinese mothers had significantly higher LA and lower EPA and DHA levels than that of the Swedish mothers. However, in Chinese breast milk the AA level was significantly higher than that in Swedish breast milk. The recommended ranges of the ratios of LA to alpha-linolenic acid (LNA, C(18 ratio 3 omega-3)) and of AA to DHA in human milk are 5-10 and 0.5-1 compared with 23.0 and 3.1 in the Chinese breast milk, and 7.5 and 1.6 in the Swedish breast milk, respectively.
CONCLUSION:
The diet of the studied Chinese mothers is less balanced with regard to the levels of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) than that of the Swedish mothers, which is also mirrored in the breast milk of these mothers. The clinical relevance of the difference between the levels of LC-PUFAs in the breast milk of Chinese and Swedish mothers may be elucidated by a follow-up study of the cognitive and visual functions of the infants involved.

(Oct 27, 2017 02:51 PM)Zinjanthropos Wrote: Diagnosed with AF 20+ years ago but only prescribed blood thinners  for the last 10. I'm on the drug (Pradaxa®- dabigitran) for life. Some may argue that I may already be demented but my question is, how would I know?


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atrial_fibrillation
Quote:The disease is associated with an increased risk of heart failure, dementia, and stroke.[2] It is a type of supraventricular tachycardia.[10]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dabigatran#Contraindications
Quote:Dabigatran, sold under the brand name Pradaxa

Quote:Adverse effects
The most commonly reported side effect of dabigatran is gastrointestinal upset. When compared to people anticoagulated with warfarin, patients taking dabigatran had fewer life-threatening bleeds, fewer minor and major bleeds, including intracranial bleeds, but the rate of gastrointestinal bleeding was significantly higher. Dabigatran capsules contain tartaric acid, which lowers the gastric pH and is required for adequate absorption. The lower pH has previously been associated with dyspepsia; some hypothesize that this plays a role in the increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding.[8]
A small but significantly increased risk of myocardial infarctions (heart attacks) has been noted when combining the safety outcome data from multiple trials.[9]
Reduced doses should be used in those with poor kidney function.[10]

just out of curiosity it would be interesting to see what the history of medication leans toward as a potential dietary interuption of absorbtion of various fatty acids.

obviousely if there is the ability to link the medication to reduced absorbtion of Omeg3 & Omega6 then it would explain the potential increase rate of dementia which could be a side effect of taking the drug.

and or continued poor digestive function and/or from lack of blood circulation resulting in a reduced ability to process, extract &/or carry & distribute fatty acids to the brain would be a critical breakthrough


My Conclusion
soo... what i do wonder is ...
those who suffer from the heart condition...
do they also suffer from a lack of the bodys ability to re-direct blood flow to critical parts of the body.
specifically the stomach at times when critical digestive processes are required for trace vitamins & minerals... which in an average diet are very small.

longatudinal (data review research)studys should be started immediately.
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#4
(Oct 26, 2017 05:05 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017...tia-stroke

"Blood-thinning drugs could protect against dementia and stroke in people with an irregular heartbeat, research suggests.

I know that arteriosclerosis (crud buildup in the arteries reducing blood flow) can cause senile dementia. My paternal grandmother suffered severe dementia for that reason when she was in in her nineties and had to be placed in professional nursing care. (She was still physically active and would try to escape, despite not having a clue who she was, where she was, what was happening, or who anyone else was. Her life-force was still strong, as Yoda would say.)

So it would be interesting to know if anti-coagulants would be helpful in these kind of cases too. I wonder if the low-dose baby-aspirin regimen has any effect on reducing senile dementia late in life. (I'm one of Rainbow's 52%)
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#5
(Oct 29, 2017 03:56 PM)Yazata Wrote:
(Oct 26, 2017 05:05 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017...tia-stroke

"Blood-thinning drugs could protect against dementia and stroke in people with an irregular heartbeat, research suggests.

I know that arteriosclerosis (crud buildup in the arteries reducing blood flow) can cause senile dementia. My paternal grandmother suffered severe dementia for that reason when she was in in her nineties and had to be placed in professional nursing care. (She was still physically active and would try to escape, despite not having a clue who she was, where she was, what was happening, or who anyone else was. Her life-force was still strong, as Yoda would say.)

So it would be interesting to know if anti-coagulants would be helpful in these kind of cases too. I wonder if the low-dose baby-aspirin regimen has any effect on reducing senile dementia late in life. (I'm one of Rainbow's 52%)

im hoping the stats blowing out now is the discovery stage of the difference in medical science between those who had no blood/plaque etc monitoring ... plus the increased life expectancy... plus the increased medical science ability to diagnose things and treat other things etc..

being able to maintain clean oil in a car engine makes a big difference.
why would this not be the same in humans ?
is there any potential reason why this idea of clean(well lubricated high functioning) blood is not talked about more often ?


is there any noticable difference in long term health for hemiphiliacs ?
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