Early deaths of young people with schizophrenia

#1
https://www.madinamerica.com/2017/09/psy...hant-room/

Quote:  Large cohort studies of people with a first-episode psychosis provide a unique opportunity for finding out why so many young people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders die at a young age. However, it seems that those psychiatrists who have access to the mortality data generally do not want the facts to come out. In published cohort studies, there is virtually always too little information or no information at all about the causes of death.

In 2012, Hegelstad et al. published 10-year follow-up data for 281 patients with a first-episode psychosis (the TIPS study). 1 Although their average age at entry into the study was only 29 years, 49 patients (17%) had died in less than 10 years. The authors’ detailed article was about recovery and symptom scores and they took no interest in all these deaths, which appeared in a flowchart of patients lost to follow-up and were not commented upon anywhere in their paper. In the text, however, they mentioned only 28 deaths (11%), so it is difficult to know how many died.
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#2
(Sep 22, 2017 02:26 AM)elte Wrote: https://www.madinamerica.com/2017/09/psy...hant-room/

Quote:  Large cohort studies of people with a first-episode psychosis provide a unique opportunity for finding out why so many young people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders die at a young age. However, it seems that those psychiatrists who have access to the mortality data generally do not want the facts to come out. In published cohort studies, there is virtually always too little information or no information at all about the causes of death.

In 2012, Hegelstad et al. published 10-year follow-up data for 281 patients with a first-episode psychosis (the TIPS study). 1 Although their average age at entry into the study was only 29 years, 49 patients (17%) had died in less than 10 years. The authors’ detailed article was about recovery and symptom scores and they took no interest in all these deaths, which appeared in a flowchart of patients lost to follow-up and were not commented upon anywhere in their paper. In the text, however, they mentioned only 28 deaths (11%), so it is difficult to know how many died.

3 basic things

1. suicide is contagious

2. the general public do not support continued government investment into mental health and some countrys its socially engineered to be completely private user pays, knowing that           those with psychiatric illnessess whom cant hold down a job can not access medical care, less soo very expensive specialised psychiatric care which takes decades to train in.

3. psychiatrists know there is a vast dicotamy in society when it comes to these facts and attempting to prevent the spread of mental illness and suicide is something they would seek to         minimalise as best as they could.

psychiatrists & psychologists do not become mental health profesionals to become rich or seek power or fame.
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#3
Could be prescription drug related. If that got out, it could really hurt their profession.
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#4
(Sep 22, 2017 03:34 AM)Syne Wrote: Could be prescription drug related. If that got out, it could really hurt their profession.

there is well documented increased inccidence of suicide of people whom start some types of anti depresants.
within the 1st 90 days roughly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antidepres...icide_risk

Quote:The relationship between antidepressant use and suicide risk is the target of medical research. Studies have shown that the use of some antidepressants correlate with an increased risk of suicide in some patients, and this problem has been serious enough to warrant government interventions in some places to label greater likelihood of suicide as a risk of using antidepressants. The circumstances under which this can happen are not clear, and other studies show that antidepressants treat suicidal ideation.


(this is me speaking my opinion here about common miss-information and un helpful people joining in the conversation to offer opinions)
[fyi syne not directing this at you personally]

what must be held at the forefront of this conversation is that "anti-depresants" are not prescribed for a better life style choice.
they are prescibed to treat a psychiatric condition which is on the most part highly complex and different from person to person.
Regardles of any over prescribing issues, miss-use, deliberate illegal supply, wrong opinions and massed incorrect facts & political baggage and propoganda.
Anti Depresants are a psychiatric medication.
without which the inccidence of self harm, harm to others and suicide would be vastly increased.

Lack of funding for mental health which leaves patients without any follow up along with very expensive medication costs, which on the whole are effectively saving their life and the lifes of their children is a false point of arguement set against a back drop of vampiric canibalisation of societys most vaulnerable.

the whole science denier metaphysics pointed toward psychiatric profesionals to render miss trust is maleficent.
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#5
(Sep 22, 2017 02:26 AM)elte Wrote: https://www.madinamerica.com/2017/09/psy...hant-room/

Quote:  Large cohort studies of people with a first-episode psychosis provide a unique opportunity for finding out why so many young people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders die at a young age. However, it seems that those psychiatrists who have access to the mortality data generally do not want the facts to come out. In published cohort studies, there is virtually always too little information or no information at all about the causes of death.

In 2012, Hegelstad et al. published 10-year follow-up data for 281 patients with a first-episode psychosis (the TIPS study). 1 Although their average age at entry into the study was only 29 years, 49 patients (17%) had died in less than 10 years. The authors’ detailed article was about recovery and symptom scores and they took no interest in all these deaths, which appeared in a flowchart of patients lost to follow-up and were not commented upon anywhere in their paper. In the text, however, they mentioned only 28 deaths (11%), so it is difficult to know how many died.

They seem to have an elevated and earlier rate of death in all areas: health conditions, accidental, intentional. There was surely such transpiring during the pre-moral era just via the degree of ignorance, abuse, and lack of concern. Any alarm should thereby rest in why the moral era either hasn't improved the situation via the changes or actually has lowered the amount of death compared to the old days -- but just isn't getting credit due to public amnesia about the deeper past, or higher expectations (of perfection) because of the limited success and uplift in care.

Treatment of the Mentally Ill in the PreMoral and Moral Era: A Brief Report
http://jdc.jefferson.edu/cgi/viewcontent...psychiatry

- - -
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#6
(Sep 22, 2017 03:34 AM)Syne Wrote: Could be prescription drug related. If that got out, it could really hurt their profession.

That is highly likely, a mixture of the extreme side effects of the drugs taken, the fact that most doctors "experiment" with the particular drugs prescribed to attempt to work out which ones are the most effective (or for the most part sticking with the ones they are familiar with which are actually not particular effective) and the social class-ism that's associated with anyone undergoing treatment. (It literally is a "black sheep" to families and society in general.)

In essence if someone has a problem they're actually pushed to be made even more miserable than if they just left the condition untreated. (It would be interesting to see the figures for those that refuse medication or treatment from hospitals as it would likely show they live longer)
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#7
(Sep 26, 2017 02:15 AM)stryder Wrote: In essence if someone has a problem they're actually pushed to be made even more miserable than if they just left the condition untreated.  (It would be interesting to see the figures for those that refuse medication or treatment from hospitals as it would likely show they live longer)

I agree. Pharmaceuticals in these cases seem to be intended to save others the discomfort of the mentally ill, by simply suppressing behavior rather than helping the underlying causes. Of course, that's been the modus operandi of psychiatry from its inception. I wouldn't be surprised at all if refusal of medication positively correlated to longer lifespan. At the very least, that demonstrates a degree of self-determinism indicative of some resilience.

Plus I've seen the kind of drug, drug to counter side-effects, drug to counter side-effects, etc., etc. circle jerk that accomplished nothing good.
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