Stronger muscles in old age

#1
There has been too much research along those lines, unfortunately.  

The bigger problem is tendons and ligaments.  They are the weak links in the chain of human mobility.  Stronger muscles tend to tear and stretch tendons and ligaments.  Just ask my knees and elbows.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-02-s...scles.html
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#2
(Feb 26, 2018 02:52 PM)elte Wrote: There has been too much research along those lines, unfortunately.  

The bigger problem is tendons and ligaments.  They are the weak links in the chain of human mobility.  Stronger muscles tend to tear and stretch tendons and ligaments.  Just ask my knees and elbows.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-02-s...scles.html

"The researchers will now continue their work to investigate whether physical exercise can affect the number of accumulated mutations. Is it true that physical exercise from a young age clears out cells with many mutations, or does it result in the generation of a higher number of such cells?"

That is a good question.

Very interesting!

Thanks, elte!
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#3
You're welcome Secular Sanity!

It could be that more exercise at a younger age affects muscles and joints in sort of opposite ways--overall more mutations in tendons and joints and less in muscles than there would be otherwise.  It could explain why my muscles tend to be too strong for my tendons and joints.

It could  be interesting to see what they find out.
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#4
(Feb 26, 2018 02:52 PM)elte Wrote: The bigger problem is tendons and ligaments.  They are the weak links in the chain of human mobility.  Stronger muscles tend to tear and stretch tendons and ligaments.  Just ask my knees and elbows.

I'm in my late 60's and exercise daily. By most standards I'm in pretty good shape for my age.

But yeah, it's the tendons that are the weakest link. Just yesterday my left knee was barking when I tried to put weight in it when it was bent, like walking up and down stairs. It was the tendons up on top of my kneecap doing the complaining. Not long ago it was the tendons on the inside of the same knee.

My elbows still work fine, but both of my shoulders flaked out on me big-time a few years ago. Adhesive capsulitis, extremely painful and it took more than a year for it to resolve on its own without medical treatment (there is no treatment apart from diagnosis, which an MRI confirmed).

It's always something it seems.
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#5
That reminds me of tendonosis in my arm a few years ago.  It took about a year for my arm to gradually recover from having only about 30% capability from the condition and I'm a bit more than ten years younger.

I had to stop riding the bike in anything except very low gears.  The ligaments in my knees were stretching and I could feel the kneebones shifting laterally and grating against each other.   When I got done riding up one hill and was resting, my knees joints would feel a bit burnt.

I feel that way too about it seems like it is always something.
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#6
I'm not at the Old Age Security level but getting closer. I attribute my avocation as basketball referee these past 35 years as the reason I'm still in good physical shape, despite the recent bout with cancer. People mistake me for a younger man all the time. Rarely do I have muscle problems and I can run fairly well. I was born with muscular legs, and about the only time they bother me is when I overstretch after lying down and get that painful charley horse sensation. Christ that hurts.... having to kick your leg out straight during those episodes takes courage sometimes, can't avoid the pain.
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#7
I like your staying in shape a lot. I think those kind of legs had some heritable aspect in my family too.  I think that played a part in my knee ligaments tending to stretch.  But I also had s sore tendons around the front of my knees too.  

Those cramps are awful, and I'm glad they usually don't last too long.  The ones I was getting were more often on the bottom of my feet, and  similarly, I got some relief with some counteracting pressure by pushing the ball of my foot against something unmoving like the floor by putting my weight on the offending foot.  The calf ones hurt more as the muscles are a lot bigger.
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#8
Big Grin 
(Feb 26, 2018 02:52 PM)elte Wrote: There has been too much research along those lines, unfortunately.  

The bigger problem is tendons and ligaments.  They are the weak links in the chain of human mobility.  Stronger muscles tend to tear and stretch tendons and ligaments.  Just ask my knees and elbows.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-02-s...scles.html

Wouldn't the problem with aging muscles and aging tendons and ligaments be the same?  I think I tore something in my shoulder while working out in the gym and a year later it is obvious it isn't going to heal.  

I suspect our bodies come with a code for shutting down.  

Have ever attempted to make bread?  If you kneed it too much it becomes like a rubber ball.  I feel like something like that has happened to all my muscles.  I am stiff and uncomfortable all over but give me steroids and I feel 18 again.   I wish science would figure this out and come up with steroids that are safe.

(Feb 28, 2018 01:14 PM)Zinjanthropos Wrote: I'm not at the Old Age Security level but getting closer. I attribute my avocation as basketball referee these past 35 years as the reason I'm still in good physical shape, despite the recent bout with cancer. People mistake me for a younger man all the time. Rarely do I have muscle problems and I can run fairly well. I was born with muscular legs, and about the only time they bother me is when I overstretch after lying down and get that painful charley horse sensation. Christ that hurts.... having to kick your leg out straight during those episodes takes courage sometimes, can't avoid the pain.

I am not sure but I think taking extra magnesium helps reduce cramps.

(Feb 26, 2018 08:11 PM)Yazata Wrote:
(Feb 26, 2018 02:52 PM)elte Wrote: The bigger problem is tendons and ligaments.  They are the weak links in the chain of human mobility.  Stronger muscles tend to tear and stretch tendons and ligaments.  Just ask my knees and elbows.

I'm in my late 60's and exercise daily. By most standards I'm in pretty good shape for my age.

But yeah, it's the tendons that are the weakest link. Just yesterday my left knee was barking when I tried to put weight in it when it was bent, like walking up and down stairs. It was the tendons up on top of my kneecap doing the complaining. Not long ago it was the tendons on the inside of the same knee.

My elbows still work fine, but both of my shoulders flaked out on me big-time a few years ago. Adhesive capsulitis, extremely painful and it took more than a year for it to resolve on its own without medical treatment (there is no treatment apart from diagnosis, which an MRI confirmed).

It's always something it seems.

Try swimming.  After hurting myself in the gym a couple of times and discovering a gym with a pool I really like, I do my exercises in the water.   I love to start out by relaxing in the hot tub and doing a few flexibility exercises.  Then I move to the pool and do a different set of stretching exercises and swim 10 or more laps.  If the pool is crowded I get out as soon I do 10 laps.  Then I end with a few minutes in the sauna to improve my circulation.  Then I rush to the grocery store and start stuffing my face with good.  Ah, I might get better results if I could avoid that last step.  

I have kind of a mini gym at home but don't use my equipment when no one holds me accountable.   From time to time I facilitate workshops on healthy living and I have to be accountable.  I feel like such a hypocrite telling people what to do to be healthy when I am not doing what I preach.  For sure my equipment at home is lightweight stuff.  No heavyweights.  After reading the OP I am not going to feel bad about not getting more muscular and stronger.
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#9
These days I actually have to consciously hold back my muscle exertions to help prevent them doing harm to my joints and tendons.
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