Aspirin for healing tooth decay

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#2
Interesting. Aspirin's usually what I take when I have a toothache or any other kind of pain. Never on an empty stomach, though.

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#3
I might try it a bit as part of a mouth wash. Unfortunately, my aspirin on hand has formed some acetic acid from age. I might try to pick up a fresh batch.

It could be that problem tooth areas should be treated only occasionally with it.
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#4
There have been other suggestions from studies like people over the age of 50 can greatly reduce heart attacks and strokes by taking one aspirin a day due to it being an Antiplatelet drug. (The suggested age balances the negative effects with the positive effects, where it's more positive than negative. Younger ages wouldn't gain much positive effect and so the negative effects are far more prevalent, thus why over 50's)

An article from earlier in the year suggests that Kings College , London is working on a drug for repairing teeth.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-38524566
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#5
I noticed taking even low dose aspirin regularly adversely affected my tendons and joints. It appears to have played a big role in causing a troublesome case of tendonosis in my arm.
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#6
(Sep 10, 2017 03:36 PM)elte Wrote: I noticed taking even low dose aspirin regularly adversely affected my tendons and joints.  It appears to have played a big role in causing a troublesome case of tendonosis in my arm.


I have no idea whether black beans are lessening any potential (future) problem in that department or not. Just eating them purely as a cheap, daily source of anthocyanins. Most people in the applicable populations around the world use the broth, but I add a minimum necessary amount of water for the dried beans to soak up in a slow cooker. There just is no broth or soupiness at the end, which is the way I like it.

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(Sep 10, 2017 07:17 AM)stryder Wrote: An article from earlier in the year suggests that Kings College , London is working on a drug for repairing teeth.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-38524566


Almost surely the approach that will be patent-worthy and thereby promoted and dispensed by dental practitioners.

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#7
(Sep 10, 2017 05:32 PM)C C Wrote:
(Sep 10, 2017 03:36 PM)elte Wrote: I noticed taking even low dose aspirin regularly adversely affected my tendons and joints.  It appears to have played a big role in causing a troublesome case of tendonosis in my arm.


I have no idea whether black beans are lessening any potential (future) problem in that department or not. Just eating them purely as a cheap, daily source of anthocyanins. Most people in the applicable populations around the world use the broth, but I add a minimum necessary amount of water for the dried beans to soak up in a slow cooker. There just is no broth or soupiness at the end, which is the way I like it.

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Beans can however also increase the problems through Lectins (Incidentally Genetic Modified food sources can be higher in Lectins than the standard variety since Lectin alteration increases resistances to Bacteria/Fungi when introduces systemically.)

Lectins for the most part are broken down through both soaking/washing and cooking. according to this is article Glucosamine can also bind Lectins.
https://blog.bulletproof.com/revenge-of-...s-lectins/

There are some cautions and information on the reported effectiveness of Glucasamine (since it's a sugar and associated with shellfish)
https://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/arth...amine.aspx
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#8
(Sep 10, 2017 05:32 PM)C C Wrote:
(Sep 10, 2017 03:36 PM)elte Wrote: I noticed taking even low dose aspirin regularly adversely affected my tendons and joints.  It appears to have played a big role in causing a troublesome case of tendonosis in my arm.


I have no idea whether black beans are lessening any potential (future) problem in that department or not. Just eating them purely as a cheap, daily source of anthocyanins. Most people in the applicable populations around the world use the broth, but I add a minimum necessary amount of water for the dried beans to soak up in a slow cooker. There just is no broth or soupiness at the end, which is the way I like it.  

That's good to know because I'm not sure if I was eating a lot of red cabbage yet when my arm was doing so bad with tendonosis.  I could see how it may have been very helpful for the condition since I eat a lot now and the arm is doing pretty well.

I like split peas and I like that as well when they turn out with all the water absorbed but very soft and well done still.


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C C Wrote: 
(Sep 10, 2017 07:17 AM)stryder Wrote: An article from earlier in the year suggests that Kings College , London is working on a drug for repairing teeth.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-38524566




Almost surely the approach that will be patent-worthy and thereby promoted and dispensed by dental practitioners.

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I asked the dental hygienist when tooth healing with stem cells would be available and she hadn't heard of it. We have to watch out a lot on our own I guess.

(Sep 10, 2017 05:55 PM)stryder Wrote:
(Sep 10, 2017 05:32 PM)C C Wrote:
(Sep 10, 2017 03:36 PM)elte Wrote: I noticed taking even low dose aspirin regularly adversely affected my tendons and joints.  It appears to have played a big role in causing a troublesome case of tendonosis in my arm.


I have no idea whether black beans are lessening any potential (future) problem in that department or not. Just eating them purely as a cheap, daily source of anthocyanins. Most people in the applicable populations around the world use the broth, but I add a minimum necessary amount of water for the dried beans to soak up in a slow cooker. There just is no broth or soupiness at the end, which is the way I like it.

- - -

Beans can however also increase the problems through Lectins (Incidentally Genetic Modified food sources can be higher in Lectins than the standard variety since Lectin alteration increases resistances to Bacteria/Fungi when introduces systemically.)  

Lectins for the most part are broken down through both soaking/washing and cooking.  according to this is article Glucosamine can also bind Lectins.
https://blog.bulletproof.com/revenge-of-...s-lectins/

There are some cautions and information on the reported effectiveness of Glucasamine (since it's a sugar and associated with shellfish)
https://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/arth...amine.aspx

I hadn't heard that interesting bit before that glucosamine is a sugar.  

I gave trying beans some effort yet I tended to feel pretty bad after eating them.  I'm not sure if was the lectins, or maybe them plus something else like electrolyte imbalance.
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