Daily multivitamin reduces risk for dementia

#1
Magical Realist Offline
https://www.cbsnews.com/boston/video/dai...udy-finds/

BOSTON – There may be a simple way for older adults to reduce their risk of dementia.

"In a randomized clinical trial, researchers at Wake Forest University found that adults 65 and older who took a daily multivitamin, in this case, Centrum Silver, showed more improvement in scores of overall cognition and memory over three years than those who took a placebo.

The effects were greatest in those with a history of cardiovascular disease.

They also looked at the effects of taking a daily dose of cocoa extract but did not find a cognitive benefit.

It's not clear which vitamins and minerals in a multivitamin might be beneficial and more research is needed before formal recommendations can be made to the public."
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#2
C C Offline
They can talk about MVs being expensive pee producers all they want. The nutritional area of research and its "publish or perish" yoke is glaringly unreliable either way its often oscillating judgements go. Believe I've already seen a headline about a recent study contradicting the conclusions of a different one weeks ago, about the effects of a particular vitamin's usage. 

I take a two-a-day (large) softgel multivitamin that's between the traditional minimum kind sold at stores since the mid-1940s and the mega-sized ingredient amount ones sold at specialty outlets (the latter I do believe is overkill). I also take any supplement with food, never on an empty stomach. 

What I care about is personal experience, not how fictional Average Person (generalized from data results) was unaffected or postively/negatively affected by _X_.

I have no problem echoing the official Establishment slogan about an _X_, since abstraction probably is the best (but still not perfect) way to dodge litigation and accusations of irresponsibility by watchdog agencies of an industry and the latter itself.

But I don't give a hoot about that as far as experimenting on myself and wanting access to _X_, if the consequences were favorable.

For instance, I've had circa 1,500 milligrams of quercetin (distributed throughout a day) in conjunction with vitamin C, swiftly eradicate the congestion and ill effects of a cold, flu, or seasonal allergy. I very much do not recommend that for anyone with a different body, but it works for this body. (Mythical Average Person, again, does have its uses for protecting those of us who are challenged or "unprivileged" with respect to the non-universal benefits or harms or "just nothing" of a particular _X_.)
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#3
Yazata Offline
(Sep 15, 2022 04:31 PM)C C Wrote: They can talk about MVs being expensive pee producers all they want. The nutritional area of research and its "publish or perish" yoke is glaringly unreliable either way its often oscillating judgements go. Believe I've already seen a headline about a recent study contradicting the conclusions of a different one weeks ago, about the effects of a particular vitamin's usage.

I'm just reflexively skeptical about what I read about health in the media. Like you say, what they say changes every week as each "study" (whatever 'studies' are, they aren't experiments) contradicts the last.

Quote:What I care about is personal experience, not how fictional Average Person (generalized from data results) was unaffected or postively/negatively affected by _X_.

Right. As long as I'm reasonably confident that it isn't doing me harm, all I care about is perceived benefits. If it seems to be doing me good, even if the perceived effect is just a placebo effect, why fight it?

You know, individualized medicine is the coming thing. Treatments and drug regimes tailored to a particular person's genetics, body and biochemistry. So if it works for me, what happens on average in a huge set of test subjects just isn't all that relevant. (So long as I avoid liver damage or whatever. Which shouldn't happen with a reasonable multivitamin dosage.)
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#4
Syne Offline
(Sep 14, 2022 11:10 PM)Magical Realist Wrote: "In a randomized clinical trial, researchers at Wake Forest University found that adults 65 and older who took a daily multivitamin, in this case, Centrum Silver, showed more improvement in scores of overall cognition and memory over three years than those who took a placebo.
Or those with good memories were the ones most likely to remember to take a daily vitamin.

Quote:The effects were greatest in those with a history of cardiovascular disease.
People who have greater incentive to remember their pills.

Quote:They also looked at the effects of taking a daily dose of cocoa extract but did not find a cognitive benefit.
Not much incentive for cocoa extract.
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#5
confused2 Offline
Most of the things I (we?) eat have at some point been alive either as plants or bacteria or animals. In the nature of eating things that have been alive they must have contained everything required for life while they were alive. There's also raw calories required to run the engines that turn whatever you get into whatever you need. There's a few known things like humans and vitamin D and cats and .. catmint?. Beyond that, barring oddities, as far as I know or care to enquire - the rest is psychology .
Diets I have tested for 12 months or more with rating out of 10..
New love+ any or no food - 10.
Hot blond + basic calories [edit.. I can't remember what] - 10
Beer and porridge - 8
Beer and junk food - 9
Whisky + toast and marmite - 7
Whisky + healthy stuff (vegetables) - 5
[Edit.. Any diet] + Vitamin supplements - subtract 2.
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