Cute tits with chicks (Spring fashion)

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#3
C C Offline
They're called chickadees in North America. Though Baeolophus does retain the "tit" in its common names, like the "titmouse".

Didn't realize they pecked at wood that much, but maybe it's allegorically fitting, in the ensuing decades following the Bill Clinton era.
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#4
confused2 Offline
We call them tits in the UK, this does result in a certain amount of schoolboy silliness but (obviously) we're far too grown up for that sort of thing here.
Being birds (like chickens) they are probably edible so I thought it would be nice to see what food gets up to when left to its own devices.
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#5
C C Offline
(Jan 10, 2022 05:33 PM)confused2 Wrote: We call them tits in the UK, this does result in a certain amount of schoolboy silliness but (obviously) we're far too grown up for that sort of thing here.
Being birds (like chickens) they are probably edible so I thought it would be nice to see what food gets up to when left to its own devices.

Speaking of chickens...

"Rooster" was another introduced change. Those prudish puritans who made the crossing didn't want to keep referring to the male bird as a...

https://www.americanheritage.com/why-do-we-say-17

The word rooster is an Americanism, and its appearance in the written record toward the end of the eighteenth century helps signal a major cultural and linguistic change, as people began to be much more fastidious when speaking of sex, death, and their bodies. This is the period when bosom, limb, and donkey replaced breast, leg, and ass; when breeches and trousers became inexpressibles, unmentionables, and nether garments; when died was superseded on gravestones by passed away, laid to rest, and fell asleep; and when the sexually potent barnyard bull was converted into the cow brute, cow’s spouse, and gentleman cow.

The oldest example of rooster in The Oxford English Dictionary comes from the diary of a 12-year-old girl, Anna Green Winslow, who was sent in 1770 from her home in Halifax, Nova Scotia, to school in Boston. A bright and sensitive observer of the contemporary scene, she noted in her journal for March 14, 1772: “Their other dish … contain’d a number of roast fowls —half a dozen, we suppose, & all roosters at this season, no doubt.”

Rooster’s origin is self-evident, referring to the bird’s habit of perching on high (ultimately from the Old English hrost, the spars or rafters of a house). Anna certainly didn’t invent the word; she picked it up from her elders, who had begun using it in preference to cock, the bird’s traditional name for a millennium. The Old English name is innocent enough, mostly likely deriving from the bird’s crowing ku-ku-roo, but it made newly genteel Americans nervous. They couldn’t say or hear the word without thinking of its other, anatomical meaning.

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