Climate change drives change in lifestyles? + Obesity sci's paradigm fatally flawed?

#1
C C Offline
Globally, climate change drives a willingness to change lifestyles
https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/09/...ifestyles/

EXCERPT: Pew surveyed people in 17 different industrialized economies in North America, Europe, and around the Pacific Rim. Obviously left out are the developing economies, which may have the most impact on the trajectory of the future climate, as well as China. But the survey does provide some perspective on public opinion in the countries that are actively pursuing policies intended to address their carbon emissions.

Most of the questions of the survey were done on a four-option scale, with people able to express degrees of agreement including "not at all," "not very," "somewhat," and "very." Typically, each of the two positive and negative options were grouped together.

The top line results are pretty clear. Seventy-two percent of those surveyed were somewhat or very concerned that they'll experience personal harm due to climate change. And an even higher percentage (80 percent) were willing to make changes in their lifestyles to limit the impacts of climate change. On average, however, there are mixed feelings about whether global society is doing everything it should, with only 56 percent feeling that we're doing a good job and 52 percent lacking confidence that we'll end up doing as much as we need to... (MORE - missing details)


How a ‘fatally, tragically flawed’ paradigm has derailed the science of obesity
https://www.statnews.com/2021/09/13/how-...f-obesity/

INTRO: I’ve been a science reporter for 40 years. I’ve wanted to assume that the experts I interview can be trusted to understand their subjects. Put simply, to get it right. But watching researchers in the field of obesity almost blindly follow a failed paradigm has led me to cross a line that few journalists ever do, to publicly embrace and promote a minority opinion that many in the obesity field think is quackery.

For nearly a century, obesity research has been predicated on the belief that the cause of the disorder “is an energy imbalance between calories consumed and calories expended,” to quote the World Health Organization. By this ubiquitous thinking, obesity is an energy balance disorder: People get fat because they take in more calories than they expend. They stay lean when they don’t.

This is the central dogma of obesity science. Virtually all obesity research is interpreted in the context of this balance principle; all related public health discussions, not just on obesity but on all the common chronic diseases that associate with it, as well as the very nature of a healthy diet, rely fundamentally on its implications... (MORE)
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#2
Syne Offline
Nope. Just had to read far enough to see them claim that metabolism was to blame (even though studies have found metabolism to be very stable according to age) to know why this was considered "quackery." Them citing philosophers, medicine in the 1930s, and playwright George Bernard Shaw doesn't help their case.

You wanna know why there's an obesity/diabetes epidemic? Because more and more affluent societies are increasingly afforded the opportunity to indulge their base human nature. As usually, scientists fail to account for humans simply doing what humans are predisposed to do.
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